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COMPLETED - COMPLETED-Sold-Selling Astronomik Ha 12nm Clip-in Filter Canon APS-C(120€)


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Selling the Astronomik 12nm clip in Ha filter for 120€. Bought it for 270 usd including vat, customs and shipping so it's a really good price.

The filter is still in excellent condition, used only twice. No fingerprints, no scratches not even dust (image attached).

I will also handle the shipping through my post office without cost. If another shipping method is requested, then we'll have to to discuss the price.

Contact me if interested.

Clear Skies,
Anthony

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Edited by Anthony RS
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