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gorann

Going deep into the Pleiades with the RASA 8

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7 hours ago, Erling G-P said:

Another stunner for sure!

Thanks Erling, much appreciated!

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On 17/10/2020 at 20:49, gorann said:

Yes it is, and I would not know how it would work in a light polluted sky. I whent into astrophotography when I bought this old farm house on the country side 10 years ago and looked up on the sky with amazement. Before that I had never even thought about doing astrophotography.

Wow, you certainly bought a LOT of gear in those 10 years, and i thought i had to pace myself 😅

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10 hours ago, Miguel1983 said:

Wow, you certainly bought a LOT of gear in those 10 years, and i thought i had to pace myself 😅

Yes, and also built myself three obsies. I have a tendency to go full in when I get interested in something, the story of my life🤪

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Inspired by Olly's @ollypenricereprocessing of his M45 data I decided to see how much details I could get out of my data, using HiPass filtering and LCE in PS. There is certainly a lot of filaments in this object. Does anyone know how they formed?

20201015 M45 RASA PS26smallSign.jpg

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40 minutes ago, gorann said:

Yes, and also built myself three obsies. I have a tendency to go full in when I get interested in something, the story of my life🤪

Spot on, I find as with most of the interests I have had, just having a bit of a dabble is never going to be enough. Many years ago I got into tropical aquaria, and ended up having an Octopus as a pet! 

Apologies mods, about as off topic as you can get.

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23 minutes ago, tomato said:

Octopus as a pet! 

Apologies mods, about as off topic as you can get.

Not at all. There’s a nebula named after about any animal you can think of.

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I like it.

With what I know about processing so far, which is probably about one percent of what might be known, is that I think that you have to decide what an image is about. You go after this at the expense of that or you go after that at the expense of this and so on. In my case I had imaged the Pleiades several times with guests and retained the data each time. But I had, in my memory, the recollection of a remarkable image in a book called something like 'The New Astronomy.' I've lost this book so I'm reliant on memory, but I think it showed a selective wavelength image which clearly demonstrated that the cluster was moving through interstellar dust. (Previously it had been assumed that the nebulosity surrounding the cluster was its natal cloud.) I was driven by the desire to trace that 'wake' through the dust so I organized both my next captures and processing to find it if I could. The victims of this approach include a natural look, small stars etc. One day someone will produce an image which will do everything but, so far, I don't know of anyone who has managed it.

A great piece of advice from a friend (advice which he only gives to himself) is 'Make your own picture.'

Olly

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13 minutes ago, ollypenrice said:

I like it.

With what I know about processing so far, which is probably about one percent of what might be known, is that I think that you have to decide what an image is about. You go after this at the expense of that or you go after that at the expense of this and so on. In my case I had imaged the Pleiades several times with guests and retained the data each time. But I had, in my memory, the recollection of a remarkable image in a book called something like 'The New Astronomy.' I've lost this book so I'm reliant on memory, but I think it showed a selective wavelength image which clearly demonstrated that the cluster was moving through interstellar dust. (Previously it had been assumed that the nebulosity surrounding the cluster was its natal cloud.) I was driven by the desire to trace that 'wake' through the dust so I organized both my next captures and processing to find it if I could. The victims of this approach include a natural look, small stars etc. One day someone will produce an image which will do everything but, so far, I don't know of anyone who has managed it.

A great piece of advice from a friend (advice which he only gives to himself) is 'Make your own picture.'

Olly

How interesting! Do you think this movement has something to do with the strange filaments moving through the M45? There is also an area there where the filaments are in a disarray, not sweeping through (on top of your image and to the right on mine). Have you found the wake?

This all makes me think again why make only one picture. In this case I think my first version was relatively soft and nice to the eye, but then it did not reveal all the infomation in there. I have for a while been thinking that it would be of value to make several "final" versions that make different statements.

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45 minutes ago, gorann said:

How interesting! Do you think this movement has something to do with the strange filaments moving through the M45? There is also an area there where the filaments are in a disarray, not sweeping through (on top of your image and to the right on mine). Have you found the wake?

This all makes me think again why make only one picture. In this case I think my first version was relatively soft and nice to the eye, but then it did not reveal all the infomation in there. I have for a while been thinking that it would be of value to make several "final" versions that make different statements.

'Do you think this movement has something to do with the strange filaments moving through the M45?'  I think it's M45 which is moving, but yes. However, I had a surprise. I thought that the 'arm' of smaller stars was leaving a trail behind it but, with sufficient data, this turned out not to be the case. This is from mine:

wake.jpg.d464daf49e868462c4cf32f965289909.jpg

The arm of stars is marked by green dots. The two green lines mark the start of trails which I initially thought came from the arm of stars but clearly they don't. What has caused them? Good question!

'I have for a while been thinking that it would be of value to make several "final" versions that make different statements.'  Yes, I absolutely agree.

Olly

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42 minutes ago, ollypenrice said:

'Do you think this movement has something to do with the strange filaments moving through the M45?'  I think it's M45 which is moving, but yes. However, I had a surprise. I thought that the 'arm' of smaller stars was leaving a trail behind it but, with sufficient data, this turned out not to be the case. This is from mine:

wake.jpg.d464daf49e868462c4cf32f965289909.jpg

The arm of stars is marked by green dots. The two green lines mark the start of trails which I initially thought came from the arm of stars but clearly they don't. What has caused them? Good question!

'I have for a while been thinking that it would be of value to make several "final" versions that make different statements.'  Yes, I absolutely agree.

Olly

So a possibility is that all these filaments have nothing to do with the stars except that they light them up, and that the stars are just moving through, maybe at quite a distance farther away? When I look at it the stars and the filamets are not well associated.

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16 hours ago, gorann said:

Yes, and also built myself three obsies. I have a tendency to go full in when I get interested in something, the story of my life🤪

sounds familiar 😅

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12 hours ago, gorann said:

So a possibility is that all these filaments have nothing to do with the stars except that they light them up, and that the stars are just moving through, maybe at quite a distance farther away? When I look at it the stars and the filamets are not well associated.

As far as I know, that is the consensus. It was previously thought that the nebulae were left-over material from the formation of the cluster, but now they are considered unrelated. Here's an interesting paper on the reflection nebulosity near the Pleiades. The filamentary structure is interesting though.

Stunning picture by the way, wonderful details!

Edited by Waddensky
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27 minutes ago, Waddensky said:

As far as I know, that is the consensus. It was previously thought that the nebulae were left-over material from the formation of the cluster, but now they are considered unrelated. Here's an interesting paper on the reflection nebulosity near the Pleiades. The filamentary structure is interesting though.

Stunning picture by the way, wonderful details!

That makes sense! As you say the filaments are interesting, some being highly directional and some rather chaotic.

Thanks a lot by the way!

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42 minutes ago, gorann said:

As you say the filaments are interesting, some being highly directional and some rather chaotic.

As I see it, there are filaments going in two directions, and an area inbetween with crossing filaments. Much like interfering waves. This is easier to see in some images than in other.

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4 minutes ago, wimvb said:

As I see it, there are filaments going in two directions, and an area inbetween with crossing filaments. Much like interfering waves. This is easier to see in some images than in other.

Interesting observation. Is such a filamentary structure common for interstellar dust clouds? Or could it be due to some gravitational interaction with the stars of the Pleiades?

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Incredible image Gorann! the striations are really intriguing- some so enormous and dead straight yet so random like fibreglass matting. No idea how they came to the conclusion that the nebulosity isn’t part of the Pleiades itself as it really looks like they’re linked!

Mark 

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1 hour ago, markse68 said:

Incredible image Gorann! the striations are really intriguing- some so enormous and dead straight yet so random like fibreglass matting. No idea how they came to the conclusion that the nebulosity isn’t part of the Pleiades itself as it really looks like they’re linked!

Mark 

Thanks a lot Mark! The first thought is of course that they are linked since they appear to be in the same spot, but after looking at it for a while I started getting the feeling that there was no obvious interaction and the stars are maybe far behind the filaments. On top of the image, for example, there are two similar lumps of filaments but only one have a major star beneath it.

Lumps of filaments marked.jpg

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The article that @Waddensky linked to, argues that the stars are behind the nebulosity, and so not part of it. If correct, there shouldn’t be any interaction between the stars and the nebula, other than light reflection.

Here’s another article on the matter.

http://adsabs.harvard.edu/full/1977ApJ...217...83A

 

Edited by wimvb
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