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Are you a member of club or society?


Mancunian Lee
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Personally I really cant be bothered with my local Astro Group, having said that it's nothing against them, they have good speakers etc. But observing for me is solitary - so I couldn't see the point.

Ant

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Manchester Astronomical Society is a cracking Club mate if you ever wanted to join up, i used to go to umist and the observatory up there some really knowledgable people there and the guest speakers are some of the top ones you could have..

James

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I am leaning strongly towards joining either the Niagara branch of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, or the Hamilon Amateur Astronomers, both of which seem to be good active groups with interesting programs. Just haven't made up my mind. I shall give one or both of them a go, though. If I don't like it, I can always not renew my membership.

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I'm a member of 2 societies.

Ewell AS a large and active society but is quite a way from where I live so I don't get to their observing sessions.

RKAS - Richmond & Kew AS, a smaller soc. No dark sky site observing at present but options are being looked at. The society also has excellent speakers who are experts in their chosen areas (namely me :lol::))

The best part of the evening is going to the pub for a drink after the meeting :)

Cheers

Ian

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I am a member of the Astronomical Society of Glasgow - they have lots of good lectures and get use of the Uni's 16" LX200 and 19" Dob. I have also been to the Ayrshire AS - very enthusiastic people with lots of energy - good talks too (+ a 5" TMB Apo on an EQ6 skyscan pro mount). I will join it next season (September).

Being a member of a couple of AS is useful, you get to talk to like minded geeks (Yes - I am one, and no problem with it). Even although I like doing most of my observing as a solitary pursuit.

Tom

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I'm thinking of joining my local Society (Wessex Astronomical Soc'y) if only to do the same as I'm doing here - to glean knowledge and info from those who have been in the game far longer than me! (and maybe get a chum to come along to dark sites, and pour the tea when I'm at the eyepiece and vice versa ....) :lol:

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We are just forming one in St Neots, It should be up and running in a month or so anyone that might be local and would like to join let me know. We are also looking for speakers on various subjects professional and amateurs are welcome.

Mark

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I have joined the Chesterfield Astro Soc. They meet once a week and have a monthly formal talk as well as informal presentations when it is cloudy - like everytime I have ever been. They have an 18" Newtonian in an observatory and a 12" meade LX. Once you have been a member for 6 months and have passed the telescope handling test you can have the keys to the observatory and can use it whenever you want. I have looked through the observatory log book and no one has used it in the last 12 months except on club nights!!! As I see it I'm going to have my own observatory!!!!!

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Yes solitary is a great thing so lets all go fishing! Many of you talk about the how and why. What eyepiece? How do i.........? To read on a form is great, but a friend with 30 40 50+ years experience will show you short cuts and techniques so much faster, maybe followed with a beer! Ask yourself, Why do I observe? Myself, I got over the Christmas Effect (looking for lookings sake, or worse bagging) long ago. Variable Star study - Tracking Comets - Detailed Study Of The Sun - Drawing The moon - Accurate use of DEC and RA - all these are faster and more productive in a group. (MKAS - SPA - BAA - CfDS) Orion f6.3

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I,m a loner as well , been there worn the tee shirt so to speak , was a member for about 4 years , i guess in my case i have just one direction , and thats imaging, so most of it was so boring going over and over the same lectures , that i lost interest , however it would be nice to have company when imaging getting the buzz etc , for now i just watch tv and the puter screen and talk to myself lol , but once the image starts coming through , it great , doing the processing and finally gettin g that image thats evaded me for so long ,,

But one thing i do like to do is Pass on info and help ppl wanting to learn all about imaging , hence being on here .

Rog

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Yes solitary is a great thing so lets all go fishing! Many of you talk about the how and why. What eyepiece? How do i.........? To read on a form is great, but a friend with 30 40 50+ years experience will show you short cuts and techniques so much faster, maybe followed with a beer! Ask yourself, Why do I observe? Myself, I got over the Christmas Effect (looking for lookings sake, or worse bagging) long ago. Variable Star study - Tracking Comets - Detailed Study Of The Sun - Drawing The moon - Accurate use of DEC and RA - all these are faster and more productive in a group. (MKAS - SPA - BAA - CfDS) Orion f6.3

After all that ,are you a member of a club or society? :?

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Not sure how pointing out its good to observe alone but better with people with experience is a load of tosh. The ref to fishing, i do enjoy this alone. As for clubs, they were in brackets at the end of my reply. Any stars anywhere all I have is rain.

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I am unable to regularly attend but I am a member of the Exeter Astro Society and Norman Lockyer Observatory (Sidmouth).

Overall, the NLO is the stronger of the two (hardly surprising with their domes, scopes and planetarium) but the Exeter lot are great company and several are at my (beginner/intermediate) level.

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Not really into the club "Thing"

Been down to the Norman Locklear observatory in Sidmouth, they have an astro society....Not interested in joining.

I like my own company and the peace and quiet...

And when I make a total hash of the imaging I don't like any one to see it!!! :lol::)

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Lone observing is good....can't beat a bit of solitude.

But i belong to my local.....SOLENT AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS SOCIETY.

A good bunch of people and a few imagers too. Nice buzz on observing nights. I don't always go to the meetings, can't stand the theory side of astronomy.....black hole garbage etc. Sooner have my teeth pulled or even watch a game of football, hmm football,actually not quite that bad.

Anyway considered leaving the club in protest when they purchased a Meade 14" SCT. Learnt to accept that everyone makes a mistake at some point and I'll let them off for that one mistake.

Regards

Russ

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I dont think its cool people cant see both sides of the coin though!!

Things may be faster and more productive as a group, but no matter what you do in life its always a better feeling to pull off something on your own (oo er)

Im new to astronomy and have just got my first scope, i imagine ill do a lot of it on my own but i know i can learn a lot from a club. Ill have access to some better equiptment and an oracle of astro-knowledge, so for me i think its the right step to make.

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