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Looking for a monopod to mount Opticron Oregon 20 x 80s. How much should I worry about the length of the thing? Over at BincoularSky he seems to advocate monopods that are not that long. I am 6 foot. Presumably you need somthing fairly long to deal with objects at higher altitudes without contorting yourself? What would be realistic?

Also if anyone has any recommendations for cheap-ish monopods that could take that weight (+ pistol grip) I'd be very grateful!

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Hi, welcome.

Most monopods aren't very tall, but that's not really a problem.

You can rest the foot of a monopod on a chair, stool or small table and use the monopod while standing up, or you can sit on a chair and rest the monopod between your feet on the ground.

I do the first. I rest the monopod on a stool and adjust it so that it has the right height for looking straight up. For looking at lower angles I need the eyepieces to be lower. I achieve that by taking a step or two back, so that the monopod slants and holds the binoculars less high.

You don't want the monopod to slip, so it's nice if you have one with a rubber foot. My small monopod has a simple hinged head that can only bend forward or back. The hinge has adjustable friction. It is ideal for changing the altitude of the binoculars. For changing the azimuth I just walk around the stool.

 

 

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11 hours ago, Ruud said:

Hi, welcome.

Most monopods aren't very tall, but that's not really a problem.

You can rest the foot of a monopod on a chair, stool or small table and use the monopod while standing up, or you can sit on a chair and rest the monopod between your feet on the ground.

I do the first. I rest the monopod on a stool and adjust it so that it has the right height for looking straight up. For looking at lower angles I need the eyepieces to be lower. I achieve that by taking a step or two back, so that the monopod slants and holds the binoculars less high.

You don't want the monopod to slip, so it's nice if you have one with a rubber foot. My small monopod has a simple hinged head that can only bend forward or back. The hinge has adjustable friction. It is ideal for changing the altitude of the binoculars. For changing the azimuth I just walk around the stool.

 

 

Thanks Ruud. Unfortunately sitting or using a stand are out in my situation.

One of the longest monopods I can find is actually a 67 inch (170cm) Amazon Basics Monopod! Is there really nothing longer. It seems much easier to find a tripod up at 180cm or so.

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4 hours ago, WinchesterAstro said:

One of the longest monopods I can find is actually a 67 inch (170cm) Amazon Basics Monopod! Is there really nothing longer. It seems much easier to find a tripod up at 180cm or so.

I also have a larger carbon tripod/monopod. As tripod it is 187 cm high. As monopod (using a leg + tripod column + ball head) it is 196 cm tall.

It is this RT85C,. Scroll down a bit and you will find a very elaborate description.

Innorel tripods are sold under many names. Mine is branded Coman. It cost me €280.

As a tripod the thing will carry 25kg. I haven't tried that, but it feels really sturdy.

 

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The monopod with the camera head is not very convenient with binos. But you can fix both issues adding a long enough piece  to the head's screw. That way you will have the length increased to your liking and also have a section bending towards you so you can stand closer to the tripod with the chest bending back when observing at high altitudes. A piece of pipe with plugs, or just an L-shape with drilled bent ends would do the trick just fine (the latter can be used to DIY a similar single-axis bino mount as Ruud has described).

Edited by AlexK

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