Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

stargazine_ep28_banner.thumb.jpg.b94278254f44dd38f3f7ee896fe45525.jpg

Recommended Posts

Hello, 

I'm new to astronomy and have recently brought a low budget telescope (about £60). I've been out a few time to view Mars and the moon. 

Obviously I can view the moon clearly and with great detail but when I go to view Mars all I can see is a bright circle. 

I'm not sure if I'm being daft or what, but I can't find anywhere online that has an answer to this. 

Details about my telescope are: 

It's a reflector telescope 

Model 76700

Diam: 76mm

Focal length: 700mm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

You have the diameter of 76mm (which is pretty low) so viewing detail on Mars should be pretty hard.

The most suitable eyepiece should be the 12.5 mm,.

Edited by Spacecake2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you see a circle, the scope is not focused properly. Try using the 12.5mm eyepiece and adjust the focus until Mars appears at it's smallest in the view. It should then look like a very small pinkish spot.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, harry_tarrant said:

Thank you! Do I need any lens filters at all? 

Not really. Just use the lower power eyepieces (20mm and 12.5mm) as you get used to using the scope. The 4mm will make things much more challenging because it gives very high magnifications - it might be useful to view the moon with though.

 

Edited by John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/10/2020 at 00:57, harry_tarrant said:

Thank you! Do I need any lens filters at all? 

If you have a Moon filter you could try that (attach it to your eyepiece input end or the diagonal if there's a thread for it), it will just reduce the dazzling brightness as Mars is outshining all except Venus and the Moon at the moment.  To dim the view further you could try reducing the aperture of your telescope with a cardboard ring taped to the front, just to reduce the amount of light from Mars entering the scope.  Mars won't be this close or bright again for 15 years so worth a go to get the best views you can!  Mars will start to get dimmer from tomorrow but also further away.

With the disc being rather small in your scope you may not be able to discern surface detail, but if your view isn't too dazzling and keep looking you might just be able to make out differences in light and dark hemispheres. 

Edited by jonathan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the eyepieces bundled with the kit allow for screwing a filter onto the bottom of the barrels, you might consider a variable-polariser...

605306732_variablepolariser7b.jpg.1dfd058a4e77965efcc37f0fd47c73d5.jpg

It's like a dimming-switch for a light-fixture within the home, but for the brighter and brightest objects of the night sky instead.  One section of the filter rotates against the other for adjustments.

I've used that one with great success, for Jupiter, Venus, and Mars...

Jupiter-Mars.jpg.60ea858915e7473db8e7d362c852a8a5.jpg

For Venus, and in seeing its Moon-like phases more distinctly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you referring to just seeing a pinkish circle? If so then given your stated telescopes aperture then I am afraid that is all your going to get.

The 4mm eyepiece is too small, a 5mm would be better. 700/5 = x140 magnification.

However the lack of aperture is a big restriction on the detail you will see. 

If you can get to a place with a good unobstructed view of the south you will get a decent view of Jupiter and Saturn with your scope. Cloud belt of Jupiter and the rings of Saturn should be quite pleasing.

However if you want more then I am afraid it's wallet opening time. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.