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NGC6826 - The Blinking Nebula


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Taken on the night of 12 September. 

NGC6826 - The Blinking Nebula.

This on Wiki:

NGC6826 is a planetary nebula located in the constellation Cygnus. It is commonly referred to as the "blinking planetary", although many other nebulae exhibit such "blinking". When viewed through a small telescope, the brightness of the central star overwhelms the eye when viewed directly, obscuring the surrounding nebula. However, it can be viewed well using averted vision, which causes it to "blink" in and out of view as the observer's eye wanders. A distinctive feature of this nebula are the two bright patches on either side, which are known as Fast Low-Ionization Emission Regions, or FLIERS. They appear to be relatively young, moving outwards at supersonic speeds.
Right ascension: 19 h 44 m 48.2 s
Declination: +50° 31′ 30.3″
Distance: ~2000 ly
Apparent magnitude (V): 8.8
Apparent dimensions (V): 27″ × 24″
Constellation: Cygnus
Radius: 0.22 x 0.20 ly
Designations: HD 186924, SAO 31951, Caldwell 15

 

Equipment: 

Imaging: C9.25; CGEM (diy hypertuned); ASI385MC; Baader neodymium filter; Astro Photography Tool

Guiding: Travelscope 70; SSAG; PHD2

Processing: DSS; Photoshop CS4 Extended 

99 x 20" lights, of which 63 were stacked; 50 x darks; 50x bias; 50 x flats

1686617300_2020-09-12--NGC6826-BlinkingNebula2.thumb.png.0f5f5a97cc55c3951f4b0166a70f1d21.png

Looks like I'm going to have to have another go at my collimation. Very happy with this even so, as it's the first serious imaging I've done for sooo long! A lot more data is required to bring out the detail in the nebula. 

Comments/suggestions welcome.

Edited by Stargazer33
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Thanks! 😊 

Still got some tweaking to do with my kit; but I've got APT plate solving and goto++ working, PHD2 is guiding with sub arcsecond total RMS and Stellarium is talking to APT. So I'm a happy bunny at the moment, 'cause I'm out imaging. 😊

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