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pedromreis

Best binoculars around €100 ?

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Hi

What do you recommend for a beginner for around 100€?

Im 47 and my sight had better days, so I need glasses for reading. Otherwise I don't use.

Also I would like nice optics and waterproof .. or at least something weather resistant.

What should I look for?

Thanks

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I recommend some type of 10x50s. These are good general purpose bins (astronomy and daytime uses). I have 10x50s and 15x70s.

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1 hour ago, George Jones said:

I recommend some type of 10x50s. These are good general purpose bins (astronomy and daytime uses). I have 10x50s and 15x70s.

Tks!

Any brands / models that you can recommend?

 

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Another vote for the Opticrons

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/opticron-binoculars/opticron-adventurer-10x50-t-wp-binocular.html

or you could have a look at these but not waterproof as far as i can see but they do have threads of for 1.25" filters

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/helios-binoculars/helios-naturesport-plus-50mm-binoculars.html

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So I've read a bit about binoculars and came across some horror stories about collimation. If I understand correctly, I cannot repair it if it become un-collimated right?

Since I'm inexperienced, how easy is to detect if a binocular is not correctly collimated?

Yesterday night I tested some Orion 10x50 and I found really hard to use them without a tripod, is this normal? And to focus, again first time and inexperienced... Would a 10x70 be easier to focus? I know more magnification equals more difficulty in use without a tripod, but is it linear? Ex: will a 15x50 be 50% more difficult to use than a 10x50? :) If this makes any sense....

 

 

 

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To check if the 2 sides are well aligned, you'll need to be able to view a target a reasonable distance away, something that has a well defined line like a roof edge or aerial. Get the bino focused and then remove from your eyes, cover one objective and look at the target then uncover the objective and see if you discern a difference/offset in the view. Your eyes will quickly adapt and merge the images so you may need to repeat a few times and worth doing the same with the other objective. At night its much easier as viewing the stars it is much harder to merge the images with so little background data for your brain to assess. Covering the objective is more reliable than trying to close and open one eye which can add it's own effects to the image you see.

Depending on which bino, you can sometimes adjust the alignment, but doing so would likely void any warranty and you won't have collimation in the true sense, but will at least have the 2 sides aligned for your specific needs. That said, it's quite easy to put the sides well out of alignment so needs to be done with care and some understanding of what it is you are adjusting.

In terms of ease of use, once you get above x7 or x8 it is harder to attain a stable image without the use of some form of support. The further up you push the magnification the harder it gets but I can't quantify  the step change from x10 to x15. For sure in winter the low temps make it harder still with the shivers. For my 10x50 they are more often used on a monopod with a trigger/ball grip and that helps too with the lower mag 8.5x44 etc. A good stable mount will always improve the clarity of the image, same with a telescope.

Edited by DaveL59

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I think I must try to test other magnifications / diameters before I buy anything.

So... adding a scope tripod/monopod to the list...

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Nikon Prostaff 3s 8x42 , a little over budget but not much. I recently bought a pair for my neighbour as a reward for a big favour, and having looked through them I'm very impressed. I was particularly looking for as wide a view as possible for the magnification, and these were up there amongst the widest. I own several pairs of Leicas, Zeiss and top end Nikons, see my sig, and the Prostaff 3s stand up very well in their company! And the neighbour is hugely plased with them.

M

Edited by Captain Magenta

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On 16/09/2020 at 08:49, pedromreis said:

So I've read a bit about binoculars and came across some horror stories about collimation. If I understand correctly, I cannot repair it if it become un-collimated right?

No, most binoculars can be recollimated. The exceptions are mostlycheap tat.

Quote

Since I'm inexperienced, how easy is to detect if a binocular is not correctly collimated?

Easy. Don't trust daylight tests on terrestrial objects - your eyes & brain try, and often manage, to compensate; this can lead to headaches and/or nausea for prolonged use. Use a bright star. Defocus the right hand side of the binocular (eyepiece dioptre adjustment). Your brain will superimpose the images from either side; If they are collimated, the focused star will appear in the middle of the defocused blob.

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13 minutes ago, BinocularSky said:

No, most binoculars can be recollimated. The exceptions are mostlycheap tat.

Easy. Don't trust daylight tests on terrestrial objects - your eyes & brain try, and often manage, to compensate; this can lead to headaches and/or nausea for prolonged use. Use a bright star. Defocus the right hand side of the binocular (eyepiece dioptre adjustment). Your brain will superimpose the images from either side; If they are collimated, the focused star will appear in the middle of the defocused blob.

Those opticrons and hellius recommended above fall into that cheap category?

Thanks!

Edited by pedromreis

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2 hours ago, pedromreis said:

Those opticrons and hellius recommended above fall into that cheap category?

No - I was referring to this sort of optomechanical dross. The Opticrons can definitely be user-adjusted; I'm not sure about the Helios.

  • Thanks 1

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