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Ags

Dark matter is more lumpy than expected

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Maybe the cause of lensing effects aren’t solely gravitational?
Chemicals, liquids between a light source can cause distortions

Imagine some mechanism out in space generating such pockets of refraction? 

Aren’t our observations ‘lensing’ through the ice fields of the Kuiper Belt?
 

Edited by Drifter
Pruning

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On 10/09/2020 at 23:24, Ags said:

High density knots of dark matter have been observed in the core of large galaxy clusters, which was not predicted by current dark matter models.

https://www.spacetelescope.org/news/heic2016/

That's interesting.

I wonder how it's related to the 'Core Cusp Problem', which (as I understand it) says that for small galaxies, the Dark Matter should have high density knots, that we don't see.

This recent report seems to be a complementary problem affecting assemblies at the other end of the galaxy cluster scale.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuspy_halo_problem

Edited by Gfamily
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On 12/11/2020 at 08:51, Gfamily said:

That's interesting.

I wonder how it's related to the 'Core Cusp Problem', which (as I understand it) says that for small galaxies, the Dark Matter should have high density knots, that we don't see.

This recent report seems to be a complementary problem affecting assemblies at the other end of the galaxy cluster scale.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuspy_halo_problem

Is it possible the data/calculations making up the computer model simulation are erroneous... rather than there being some unknown factor interfering with the observation?

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On 12/11/2020 at 00:40, Drifter said:

Maybe the cause of lensing effects aren’t solely gravitational?
Chemicals, liquids between a light source can cause distortions

Imagine some mechanism out in space generating such pockets of refraction? 

Aren’t our observations ‘lensing’ through the ice fields of the Kuiper Belt?
 

That would be a simply unbelievable amount of liquid/chemicals to cause the extent of gravitational lensing recorded. Most improbable. 

Jim 

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On 24/11/2020 at 19:18, saac said:

That would be a simply unbelievable amount of liquid/chemicals to cause the extent of gravitational lensing recorded. Most improbable. 

Jim 

Good point. 
Just positing the idea that gravitational lensing could be caused by many things currently invisible to our telescopes ... I gave the Asteroid belt ice objects as an example ... interesting to know how much refraction is out there we can’t see ..... from the gravitational forces generating it’s shape and extent.
 

But there also might be other factors that might be invisible to our science eg: multiverse interferences .... if theoretical physicists have their say?

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Gravitational lensing by things not seen by our telescopes is almost the very definition of dark matter, apart from other gravitational effects like the motions observed in the outer parts of galaxies in H-I observations by Westerbork and other radio telescopes. Asteroids do not explain the effects seen.

 

The idea that the algorithms used in computation are wrong can be countered by the fact that many different pieces of code have been developed by different groups, and the different packages yield similar results. All the code used is open source and peer reviewed, so unless you can point to a particular error you have found (always possible), just saying the code must be wrong is not a good scientific argument.

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