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If Betelgeuse Went...

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Beetlejuice is 642.5 LY from Earth, so none of us would bee alive to see it  happen. That is unless it's already gone bang in say the last 642.5 yrs.

 

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2 hours ago, LukeSkywatcher said:

Beetlejuice is 642.5 LY from Earth, so none of us would bee alive to see it  happen. That is unless it's already gone bang in say the last 642.5 yrs.

 

Paul honestly mate it did go bang exactly 234511.5 days ago (642.5 yrs)  we only got to wait one more night - happening tomorrow you'll see  :)

Jim 

 

ps unless it  is  cloudy :) 

Edited by saac
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On 05/11/2020 at 12:17, kirkster501 said:

It'd be hundreds of years until the gas cloud became visible enough for amateurs to see.  I'd rather keep it as it is :)

I guess with the rate light pollution is increasing only off-world orbital telescopes will see it even then.

At this rate even the sun will be blotted out with all the lights that are being run in an "I'm brighter than you are!" game of one-upmanship soon enough. 

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On 05/11/2020 at 20:53, saac said:

Paul honestly mate it did go bang exactly 234511.5 days ago (642.5 yrs)  we only got to wait one more night - happening tomorrow you'll see  :)

Jim 

 

ps unless it  is  cloudy :) 

UNLESS IT IS CLOUDY! It is always cloudy. I reckon the whole of Orion has disappeared since I last had a clear night. 
Does the above give anyone the strange idea I maybe in crisis? Two clear nights since the beginning of September and I had food poisoning.

Does bad weather come in light years? Feels like it right now.

Marv

Just realised that my whole reply post has been about weather. So mods delete, or move depending on your mood. A rant about the weather must have happened here before, no?

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Well a top astro scientist said thet he found a type of xray  coming off it that is only found if it has gone bang 

So it may have but now they are all talking about life on Venus  and water they found on mars 

Edited by Neil H

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14 minutes ago, Neil H said:

Well a top astro scientist said thet he found a type of xray  coming off it that is only found if it has gone bang 

So it may have but now they are all talking about life on Venus  and water they found on mars 

That’s interesting. I was told that we would have a precursor to the big B going bang in a flood of Nutrinos right before the explosion.

From my investigation the search for neutrinos on mass is almost zero as we do not have the kit to detect them. Our ability to detect neutrinos is rather lacking.

Bear in mind that if that flood of neutrinos happened fifty years ago then we would have no idea that it was about to go pop in relation to light travelling across the void to our place in the universe. The thing I don’t understand is that my understanding is that at just before the point of SN there is a Nutrino burst. 

If nothing can travel faster than the speed of light, how can a neutrino burst right before the SN give us a heads up when we cannot detect a neutrino burst in the first place.

Marv

 

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The neutrino flood comes directly from the collapsing core, while it takes an hour or so for the shock wave to make its way to the surface of the star. The speed of the neutrinos is only slightly less than light, so would still get here an hour before the light.

Plenty of time these days for every telescope that could see Betalgeuse to slew to it.

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3 minutes ago, DaveS said:

The neutrino flood comes directly from the collapsing core, while it takes an hour or so for the shock wave to make its way to the surface of the star. The speed of the neutrinos is only slightly less than light, so would still get here an hour before the light.

Plenty of time these days for every telescope that could see Betalgeuse to slew to it.

But if we cannot detect the neutrino burst then what use is it to us? It is nice that the neutrino gets to us before the light but it still remains inconsequential as we cannot detect it. (as I understand right now)
If it is undetectable how does that give us time for all the scopes on the planet to slew to it?

Just a thought. Why not have one scope permanently observing the big B? If this star is the mostly likely SN candidate then surely the idea of missing the moment due to scope time is crazy.

M

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6 minutes ago, Neil H said:

Well this is well above my pay grade 

Mine too in truth. I’m just blagging it in hope of an unexpected honorary doctorate.

M

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Neutrino detection is now very good, much better than they were in 1987 to catch the neutrinos (I think it was only 7) from that supernova.

In fact, given how much more sensitive they are, and how close Betelgeuse is (600 LY, vs 187,000 LY) they may actually saturate.

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