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I purchased a Celestron Powerseeker 70EQ at a Goodwill thinking it was a great find for my first telescope. I get home and realize that it may be missing an eye piece. I'm unsure what else it is missing though. Where can I go to get the missing eye piece for this telescope? I don't know anything about telescopes so I'm not sure where to go or what else I will need or what else could be missing. I attached an image of it with what I think is missing.

IMG_9502.jpg

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You can pick up 1.25" eyepieces on E Bay and many other outlets.

Peter

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This is what came with the kit...

050234210379_PowerSeeker_70EQ_21037_7_57

I have that same 4mm from a Celestron "AstroMaster" 70EQ.  I like it a lot.  The 3x-barlow pictured there is junk.  I also got the same diagonal within your image...

986041330_CelestronAmici2.jpg.bd31e4181f8e425406037050b11d30a0.jpg

That's an Amici, correct-image diagonal.  It's best for daytime/terrestrial use; birds in trees, ships at sea, that sort of thing.  It can be used at night, but on brighter objects you may see the Amici-line; an illuminated streak across the object...

V8Ne5tE.jpg

For use at night, you may prefer a STAR-diagonal; for example...

https://www.rothervalleyoptics.co.uk/celestron-90-degree-star-diagonal-125.html

The light-port of the Amici(left) compared to that of the Star(right)...

817161551_AmicivsStar2b.jpg.08af40962afb2114ce1770b6b4de16dc.jpg

That of the Star being ideal for illuminating your eyepieces at night.

In so far as eyepieces, Plossls offer great value for the outlay, but don't choose a Plossl shorter than 9mm; for examples...

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/celestron-eyepieces/celestron-omni-plossl-eyepiece.html

To reach the higher powers, you might prefer a barlow; for example...

https://www.rothervalleyoptics.co.uk/antares-x2-achromat-fmc-barlow-lens-125.html

Incidentally, you can convert a 2x-barlow into a 3x by placing the 2x into the refractor first, then the diagonal and eyepiece into the barlow.  It's actually more ergonomic that way.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Hi @Starbuddypal and welcome to SGL. :hello2:

This series of eyepiece... https://www.firstlightoptics.com/bst-starguider-eyepieces.html are popular some SGL’ers for very little money/outlay or there are these... https://www.firstlightoptics.com/vixen-eyepieces/vixen-npl-eyepieces.html

There are other brands available, and it does not necessarily have to be or have Celestron printed/stamped on itAs long as it is 1.25” you will be ok.

 

edit: I was out this morning and now I am home and seen the larger image. It appears to be missing a flexible shaft for the RA or Dec axis. They can be obtained online, bricks & mortar astro-dealers or secondhand astro-classifieds.

Edited by Philip R
additional text

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Hard to see from that picture, but are there 2 slow-motion controls? These are the long flexible rods with a knob at the end. I can see one but not the other.

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8 hours ago, Pixies said:

Hard to see from that picture, but are there 2 slow-motion controls? These are the long flexible rods with a knob at the end. I can see one but not the other.

Is the attached image what you mean? That’s the only rod I could find that extends out that has knobs.

1B5FBFEB-CCE3-400F-AED0-6439A9E5FDEB.jpeg

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10 hours ago, Alan64 said:

This is what came with the kit...

050234210379_PowerSeeker_70EQ_21037_7_57

I have that same 4mm from a Celestron "AstroMaster" 70EQ.  I like it a lot.  The 3x-barlow pictured there is junk.  I also got the same diagonal within your image...

986041330_CelestronAmici2.jpg.bd31e4181f8e425406037050b11d30a0.jpg

That's an Amici, correct-image diagonal.  It's best for daytime/terrestrial use; birds in trees, ships at sea, that sort of thing.  It can be used at night, but on brighter objects you may see the Amici-line; an illuminated streak across the object...

V8Ne5tE.jpg

For use at night, you may prefer a STAR-diagonal; for example...

https://www.rothervalleyoptics.co.uk/celestron-90-degree-star-diagonal-125.html

The light-port of the Amici(left) compared to that of the Star(right)...

817161551_AmicivsStar2b.jpg.08af40962afb2114ce1770b6b4de16dc.jpg

That of the Star being ideal for illuminating your eyepieces at night.

In so far as eyepieces, Plossls offer great value for the outlay, but don't choose a Plossl shorter than 9mm; for examples...

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/celestron-eyepieces/celestron-omni-plossl-eyepiece.html

To reach the higher powers, you might prefer a barlow; for example...

https://www.rothervalleyoptics.co.uk/antares-x2-achromat-fmc-barlow-lens-125.html

Incidentally, you can convert a 2x-barlow into a 3x by placing the 2x into the refractor first, then the diagonal and eyepiece into the barlow.  It's actually more ergonomic that way.

 

 

This is the only eye piece (diagonal?) it has. So the kit you said came with 3 eye pieces so basically I do need to find an eye piece or 2 or 3. 
I mostly want to use it for the Moon, Saturn and Jupiter and not for daytime use. So I will look for a STAR diagonal and go from there.

D164151E-17D2-4842-85C0-D0AE60BB929A.jpeg

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10 hours ago, Philip R said:

Hi @Starbuddypal and welcome to SGL. :hello2:

This series of eyepiece... https://www.firstlightoptics.com/bst-starguider-eyepieces.html are popular some SGL’ers for very little money/outlay or there are these... https://www.firstlightoptics.com/vixen-eyepieces/vixen-npl-eyepieces.html

There are other brands available, and it does not necessarily have to CelestronAs long as it is 1.25” you will be doing ok.

This is the only thing my Celestron has. Do I need to get a new one of these for looking at stars/planets or could I just get one of those eye pieces and attach it to what I have?

EF54B04B-0C5D-41E1-9FFB-B74C442054B3.jpeg

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the 2 knobs I mentioned:

image.png.f29cfb261c4c9cc65fafa7eb33f3e591.png

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Posted (edited)
On 30/08/2020 at 12:14, Starbuddypal said:

This is the only eye piece (diagonal?) it has. So the kit you said came with 3 eye pieces so basically I do need to find an eye piece or 2 or 3. 
I mostly want to use it for the Moon, Saturn and Jupiter and not for daytime use. So I will look for a STAR diagonal and go from there.

D164151E-17D2-4842-85C0-D0AE60BB929A.jpeg

I've found Agena Astro to be a very good source for accessories...

https://agenaastro.com/eyepieces/1-25-eyepieces/shopby/gso_plossl-gso_superview.html

The 20mm "SuperView" would work very well with the telescope.

Plossls are the minimum in performance-eyepieces, and a great value.  Again, no shorter than 9mm; you can barlow a 9mm for a simulated 4.5mm... https://agenaastro.com/meade-series-4000-126-1-25-2x-short-focus-barlow-lens.html

A prism star-diagonal... https://www.highpointscientific.com/celestron-1-25-90-prism-star-diagonal-94115-a

A mirrored-star, however I've read of one instance where the user had to collimate, shim, the mirror within...

https://agenaastro.com/gso-1-25-90-refractor-mirror-star-diagonal.html

EBay is a source for other types of eyepieces, diagonals and barlows, for less in many cases...

https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_nkw=eyepieces&_sacat=0&LH_TitleDesc=0&Brand=SVBONY&_dcat=29954&rt=nc&LH_PrefLoc=1

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1-25-Barlow-Lens-2X-Metal-Coated-Camera-Interface-for-Telescope-Eyepiece/171773170616?hash=item27fe7a93b8:g:1pYAAOSwJ15eqihr

Some, if not many, of those have a plastic lens or two.  I suggest that the star-diagonal to be had elsewhere.

Edited by Alan64

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On 30/08/2020 at 14:32, Pixies said:

the 2 knobs I mentioned:

image.png.f29cfb261c4c9cc65fafa7eb33f3e591.png

Yes they are there. I have no idea what they do though. Still a learning process for me.

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23 hours ago, Alan64 said:

I've found Agena Astro to be a very good source for accessories...

https://agenaastro.com/eyepieces/1-25-eyepieces/shopby/gso_plossl-gso_superview.html

The 20mm "SuperView" would work very well with the telescope.

Plossls are the minimum in performance-eyepieces, and a great value.  Again, no shorter than 9mm; you can barlow a 9mm for a simulated 4.5mm... https://agenaastro.com/meade-series-4000-126-1-25-2x-short-focus-barlow-lens.html

A prism-star-diagonal... https://www.highpointscientific.com/celestron-1-25-90-prism-star-diagonal-94115-a

A mirrored-star, however I've read of one instance where the user had to collimate, shim, the mirror within...

https://agenaastro.com/gso-1-25-90-refractor-mirror-star-diagonal.html

EBay is a source for other types of eyepieces, diagonals and barlows, for less in many cases...

https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_nkw=eyepieces&_sacat=0&LH_TitleDesc=0&Brand=SVBONY&_dcat=29954&rt=nc&LH_PrefLoc=1

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1-25-Barlow-Lens-2X-Metal-Coated-Camera-Interface-for-Telescope-Eyepiece/171773170616?hash=item27fe7a93b8:g:1pYAAOSwJ15eqihr

Some, if not many, of those have a plastic lens or two.  I suggest that the star-diagonal to be had elsewhere.

Okay so I am leaning toward getting the GSO 1.25" SuperView Eyepiece - 20mm along with the Celestron 1.25" 90º Prism Star Diagonal - 94115-A from agenaastro.com. The telescope I bought was priced at $25 so buying those pieces would basically bring it up to around the normal retail price of the telescope once added all together.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Starbuddypal said:

Okay so I am leaning toward getting the GSO 1.25" SuperView Eyepiece - 20mm along with the Celestron 1.25" 90º Prism Star Diagonal - 94115-A from agenaastro.com. The telescope I bought was priced at $25 so buying those pieces would basically bring it up to around the normal retail price of the telescope once added all together.

AA is showing the Celestron star-prism as being out-of-stock.  If you want a prism, you can get in line for the Celestron here...

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/201981-REG/Celestron_94115_A_Star_Diagonal_1_25.html

They will fill the order once the stock is replenished.  I've ordered from them many times, and the prices are great, too, with free-shipping just as with AA.  Or, you can go with the mirror-star from AA immediately.

I've purchased a few entry-level telescope kits in the last few years; to get a feel for what's currently out there in the marketplace.  I've found that you do get a good telescope, and where it really counts; the mount often lacking here and there but doable; in getting the telescope up off of the ground at least.  Then, the eyepieces and accessories thrown in are only to get one started, with at least something or other.  Here are the few that I got with those kits...

1500682633_entry-levelaccessories2.jpg.bb7aea3dd3802f448e5013be182eee83.jpg  

The lens(es) and bodies of the barlows are of plastic.  I tore the one at upper-right apart to find that out.  It produced false-colour, and with a Newtonian no less.

Those three Meade eyepieces there at bottom-left produced views that were grainy; lattice-like.

Eyepieces are the whole other half of a telescope.  You can't use one without the other.  The two are one, yet separate.  Eyepieces are made with costly optical-quality glass, therefore the manufacturers are not going to include even middling-quality eyepieces, diagonals and barlows within an entry-level kit.  But again, you do get a good telescope generally, and where it really matters.

Here's something you might find somewhat startling.  The 70mm f/10 achromat of your Celestron "PowerSeeker" kit comes with a much better focusser than that of the 70mm f/13 achromat of my somewhat more costly Celestron "AstroMaster" kit...

kit4.jpg.4ad0c4a873175b409b2acef64a87ab4c.jpg    

It came with a focusser from heck...

focusser14b.jpg.3b0c40d05df2752adc25df03ded0bb9a.jpg

I won't be satisfied until I replace it with one like your own.  If I had it to do all over again, I would've gotten the same kit as yours, albeit at f/10 as I do prefer the longer f/13.

Eyepieces, barlows and diagonals are like luggage, and for life.  As long as they're not damaged or spirited away, you'll always have them, and for other telescopes that may be had in future.  Therefore, don't hesitate to invest in them, and over time.  You don't have to get them all at once, and you don't have to get expensive ones either.  When I say "expensive" I'm talking over $50 each or so.  

You may want a barlow in future, to see the glimmering, shimmering diffraction-rings of Polaris, and with one of its companion-stars there within the view as well.

Edited by Alan64

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Starbuddypal said:

Yes they are there. I have no idea what they do though. Still a learning process for me.

Have a look at this guide. Mind you - at one point he says 'longitude' when he means 'latitude'. 

 

Edited by Pixies

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I have that same kit.  It's a hoot and a holler.

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By the by, you can transform an EQ-1 equatorial into an easier-to-use "AZ-1" alt-azimuth...

395890775_alt-azimuthmode3.jpg.90a4282d728b4121effbdba42c5e74f6.jpg

You simply throw the RA-axis body all the way back to the 90° mark on the latitude-scale, un-clamp both axes, and away you go.  The slow-motion controls may be used as well. 

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11 hours ago, Alan64 said:

You simply throw the RA-axis body all the way back to the 90° mark on the latitude-scale, un-clamp both axes, and away you go

Thats one of the best tips I have seen! There is lots of info on adding a wedge to make AZ work like an EQ, but not much mention of the other way around 👍

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20 hours ago, Alan64 said:

You simply throw the RA-axis body all the way back to the 90° mark on the latitude-scale, un-clamp both axes, and away you go.  The slow-motion controls may be used as well. 

I used to do the same with my Prinz Astral 500 as I could not get used to the RA & Dec setting circles. The latitude scale was :cussing: too!

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It would be better for your viewing if you learned to use the EQ as it was intended. If you want to see the Moon and Planets at higher magnifications it is easier "track" them by using the equatorial. I started with a Tasco 60 mm refractor and an EQ-1 mount and once you get your brain around how the mount works it enhances the enjoyment.

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10 hours ago, AstroMuni said:

Thats one of the best tips I have seen! There is lots of info on adding a wedge to make AZ work like an EQ, but not much mention of the other way around 👍

It's how you would use an EQ mount at the poles!

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The conversion is only viable in a pinch, if you don't have a dedicated, tripod-type alt-azimuth.  Still, one cannot deny the versatility in that.  Also, the counter-weight must be used, and to balance that side of the mount, opposite the telescope.

An EQ-2 may be converted as well, even an EQ-3, but as you go up in size modifications are required.  The EQ-1 is the only equatorial that may switch back and forth between modes without modification.

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10 hours ago, Pixies said:

It's how you would use an EQ mount at the poles!

Sometimes the answers which are staring at us are not the ones that come to our minds! Otherwise this forum would have had far fewer posts 😉

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Here is another couple of video guides to help you get used to setting up an EQ mount and RA & Dec setting circles...

 

 

 

Edited by Philip R

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My GSO 1.25" SuperView Eyepiece - 20mm came in the mail today. I wasn't sure if it would work yet for what I have or lack thereof. I have not purchased a star diagonal yet. In the upper right corner you can see Jupiter as a blurry pale white dot. I was trying to look at that since it was the brightest object but I couldn't find it in my eyepiece. I use an app to find the positions of the planets and stars.

 

 

 

IMG_9786.thumb.JPG.e9be9486657c4e4d0532112f4f253148.JPG

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