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Any half decent observing sites within 30 minutes drive of Stotfold, Hertfordshire


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Hello, 

Unfortunately, I will be moving from my Bortle class 3/4 skies overlooking the Cotswolds, to somewhere with class 6 skies 😫

Does anybody with any local knowledge around the Stotfold area have any observation site suggestions? Away from any local light pollution at least. It would seem driving east maybe productive according to https://www.lightpollutionmap.info

Thanks

Mike

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