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I'm trying to get a photo of Jupiter and Saturn with my Nikon D3000 DSLR but I can't get anything clear. I attached the kind of photos I'm getting with my camera. They end up being too bright and no distinguishable features show up. Is it even possible for my Nikon to get photos of planetary objects like Saturn and Jupiter?

DSC_0119.JPG

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7 hours ago, Starbuddypal said:

I'm trying to get a photo of Jupiter and Saturn with my Nikon D3000 DSLR but I can't get anything clear. I attached the kind of photos I'm getting with my camera. They end up being too bright and no distinguishable features show up. Is it even possible for my Nikon to get photos of planetary objects like Saturn and Jupiter?

DSC_0119.JPG

How are you using your Nikon? Is it on a tripod with camera lense or attached to a telescope in some way?
If on a tripod with lense, what is the focal length, ie what number in mm are you using. My kit lense which at its shortest is 18mm and longest 55mm will literally only give me tiny spots of lights for the planets.

A much longer lense like 200mm will be better but I doubt if you will see anything more than the disk and perhaps the moons as points of light.

To photograph the planets in more detail you will need to attach your camera body to a telescope and use a Barlow for extra magnification. You are also going to need to put your camera settings to manual. I would advise looking on the Imaging Planetary section on this site.

Marvin

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