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Why did astronomy adopt the word 'slew'


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Looked it up in the dictionary ... doesn't sound like the way I treat my scope 😂

1.turn or slide violently or uncontrollably.

"the Renault slewed from side to side in the snow"

2.(of an electronic device) undergo slewing.

noun: slew; plural noun: slews; noun: slue; plural noun: slues

a violent or uncontrollable sliding movement.

"I was assaulted by the thump and slew of the van"

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As in "She slew him when she found out how much his eyepieces had cost"

Merriam Webster has "to turn something about a fixed point that is usually an axis".  May be originally nautical as they give a ships spar as well as a telescope  as examples. Regards Andrew

I managed to resist posting a music vid........just. 😁😁😁

Merriam Webster has "to turn something about a fixed point that is usually an axis". 

May be originally nautical as they give a ships spar as well as a telescope  as examples.

Regards Andrew 

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1 hour ago, matthasboldlygone said:

Looked it up in the dictionary ... doesn't sound like the way I treat my scope 😂

1.turn or slide violently or uncontrollably.

"the Renault slewed from side to side in the snow"

2.(of an electronic device) undergo slewing.

noun: slew; plural noun: slews; noun: slue; plural noun: slues

a violent or uncontrollable sliding movement.

"I was assaulted by the thump and slew of the van"

Sounds pretty accurate to my methods after a bottle of wine!! 🤪..........I mean at the scope.......not in a van!!

Edited by Jiggy 67
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In digital design, slew rate is the speed at which a device transitions from 0 to 1 or 1 to 0.  There's no pivoting involved at all, so explain that one. :icon_scratch:

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The shorter OED has 1769 "To turn (a thing) round upon it's own axis, or without shifting it from its place; also loosely to swing round." 

It does not give an origin for the word .

Given this it fits rather well.

Regards  Andrew 

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5 minutes ago, johninderby said:

”The noun slew, for instance, is from the Irish Gaelic sluagh, meaning "multitude."

I believe it's sometimes used in this sense in American English.

James

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Another dictionary definition, this time more appropriate. 😁

Definition of slew 

transitive verb

1: to turn (something, such as a telescope or a ship's spar) about a fixed point that is usually the axis

 

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39 minutes ago, johninderby said:

...... As an unrelated verb, it's the past tense of slay.”

As in "She slew him when she found out how much his eyepieces had cost" :wink:

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11 hours ago, tooth_dr said:

It also means to 'turn about an axis'

 

10 hours ago, andrew s said:

Merriam Webster has "to turn something about a fixed point that is usually an axis". 

 

 

Just saying 😂😂

Edited by tooth_dr
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9 hours ago, matthasboldlygone said:

Thank you

Lol this was not aimed at you at all, it was very specifically about the post linked 

Edited by tooth_dr
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Not to mention it rhymes with slough in American pronunciation meaning a swampy drainage or marsh.  We had one on our acreage that never dried out.  Anything with wheels would get stuck in it when trying to traverse it.  When I first heard about slew rate in electronics, I was mystified as to why you would use the same word for something totally unrelated.  I had no idea at the time that the swampy usage wasn't spelled slew since that's the most obvious way to spell it, just like threw, brew, or shrew.

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