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Hedging as a light shield


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I was wondering what type of hedging plants have been used successfully as a light shield whether planted specifically for that reason or coincidentally pre-existing. Obviously a hedge isn't much use against street lighting up high but more as a shield against those near horizontal security lights.

Thanks  

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Buddleia very good. Smells fantastic, very attractive. Insects, especially butterflies love it and it grows extremely fast. And it doesn't mind a brutal prune from time to time as and when necessary.

Edited by Captain Magenta
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Interesting, glad I asked, both Buddleia and Laurel would never of occurred to me. My limited knowledge of such struggled to get beyond Privet and Conifer. A while back I read an article about how a type of conifer was found to be the best natural sound barrier/absorber which stuck in my mind as a handy by-product of a light screen 😀

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I have a love-hate relationship with my laurel hedge,  It is about 20ft high, and a very effective screen and light blocker.  But otherwise it's complete PITA.  i keep it under control using a lopper on a 4m pole, but really, laurel is a potnetial monster!  Use it, but do keep it to your required hight and don't let if get too big unless you have space.   

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Privet is a useful plant (as is Buddleia) as many pollinator insects feed on the flowers and it then Privet has berries. You might want to consider any neighbours and the High Hedge Act (UK). The use of temporary light shielding can be effective against intrusive light sources.

Edited by happy-kat
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A +vote for privet, easily clipped and maintained, in fact the more it is maintained the more dense it is. Good for the smaller garden, quickish growing . The clippings and prunings are easily shredded and quick to compost. It strikes easily from bits stuck in the ground, to cheaply extend your plantation, oh, pardon me, I mean your hedge :) Tell me about it, I forgot to put my freshly cut privet poles (not from a trimmed hedge!) in upside down this year for my beans and they are now sprouting !

Laurel can be a bit of a monster and takes an effort to shred for slow composting. Also easily propagated.

Beech can be good but deciduous, so in its first few years it is a bit thin, however when established and maintained it will hold its (dried brown) leaves through the winter. Not so ready to strike cuttings as some of the others mentioned.

Beware buddleia, are they not (mostly) deciduous ? The common davidii is, and thin.

 

Edited by Corncrake
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On 12/07/2020 at 09:26, happy-kat said:

Privet is a useful plant (as is Buddleia) as many pollinator insects feed on the flowers and it then Privet has berries.

Yes, please don't hack it to shreds before it has flowered as seems to be the norm around here! These pristine, sculpted, architectural wonders that never get the chance to flower! The bees love it. :)

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