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Photoshop Processing

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It's the first book I got about processing, when I knew absolutely nothing Dave. Very good and in-depth.

I still refer to it from time to time.

Cheers

Rob

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Looks very interesting Dave. Do you have the book, or are you contemplating buying it, and if so, where from? I may be interested in buying it myself. It aint cheap, £59.99 from Amazon.

Ron.

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Thanks for that Rob.

Ron, its available from SCS Astro at £35 + £5.50 p&p.

'The new CCD astronomy' was once one of the 'bibles' of CCD imaging, but this book is now out of print, and not to be re-published.

I have Photoshop for Astrophotographers, and this is very good, but I enjoy reading books on image processing, especially when they major on P/shop.

So, this book 'caught my eye', and hence my interest.

The only concern that I have, is that it might offer nothing different to Photoshop for astrophotographers.

Dave

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It is stuff like histograms, levels and curves, creating LRGB images, star shrinking, sharpening, noise reduction, layer masking etc etc.

Mine is currently out on loan, but you're welcome to borrow it for a look when I get it back in a couple of weeks if you want to check it out Dave.

Cheers

Rob

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Ok, thanks Rob, I'll bear your kind offer in mind.

Its a later publication than the others I've mentioned, plus the fact that Photoshop for astrophotographers is a CD based book, so not so easy to read from the comfort of armchair. Unless of course I use the lap-tap, but even then, still not the same as a book.

Bill,

I'll give the library a try, although the book isn't published in th UK, but the US.

Dav

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If there is a CD with the book, is that not a reason to impose VAT. I'm sure I came across this when buying a computer technical manual from Ottakers a number of years ago.

Ron.

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I bought a copy for myself for xmas, got it from SCS as it was the cheapest place.

It looks to be very in depth, although I'm only about 30 pages in at the moment, I have skimmed through all of it and I think it covers everything needed. It comes with a DVD containing about 3GB of images that you use while working through the tutorials in the book.

Ian

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"in for a penny, in for a pound", so I thought sod it, and I've just ordered the book from SCS. :hello2:

As Ian says, it was the cheapest place, especially when you consider the Amazon price :shock: .

Dave

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I'm wavering myself. I don't know if I should or not. I think I should get some imaging done and then worry about the processing. :hello2:

After all, a few questions asked here and there can usually get you started. :D

I have Ron Wodaski's The New CCD Astronomy, and I have not got far into that yet.

Ron.

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I'll let you know what I think of Ron, once I've had a chance to peruse it.

I have 'The handbook of astronomical image processing' by Richard Berry & James Burnell, which runs to almost 700 pages. This is a very in-depth book, and cost £75, albeit including the AIP4WIN 2.0 software. However, it is very general in its approach to the whole subject, albeit very comprehensive, and mathematical.

I never did get around to buying Ron Wodaski's book 'the new ccd astronomy', but it is know, its a very well respected book.

I also have Jerry Lodriguez's 'book, 'Photoshop for Astrophotography', and while it is an excellent book, it is CD based, and quite a bit older than 'Photoshop Astronomy'.

So, I'm looking forward to reading the new book, and hopefully learning some more from it.

Dave

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Well Dave, your work so far indicates you probably don't need another book :D, however, anything that can improve an imagers techniques can only be a big bonus. Personally, I think I need to stop spending, and start doing. :hello2:

Ron.

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Well, I now have this book :) .

Although so far, I've only 'flicked through' the book, and read the first 40 pages, I'm impressed.

Comprehensive, well written, in depth, and a lot to be digested.

Have I learnt anything new from those first 40 pages?, most definitely!!

Dave

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I got the book a while ago and it certainly has some useful stuff in it. However, I find the style a little ponderous and heavy going in the early parts. It seems to concentrate an awful lot on monitor calibration and seems to assume you have the desire and budget to get the very best out of your monitor.

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unless your monitor is properly calibrated then your going to be up against it when it comes to getting the most out of your images... especially if you want others to be able to see them as you do...

I think I'll have to get this book I have quite a library of books on CS/PS for Digital Photographers but think astrophotography is sufficiently different to require another book...

Will order it tomorrow...

Something to read on cloudy nights...

Billy....

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The author does rightly state, that your monitor, and the way it is setup, is the 'key' to whole process of colour management, and writes in depth on this, right at the start of book.

That's about as far as I've got, but in doing so, I now have a far better understanding of 'colour management', and the various protocols surrounding the whole business of 'colour workspace'.

I guess its all down to personal choice really, as the whether you want 'pick up' a few useful tips to help with your image processing, or a more in depth understanding of the process as a whole.

I'm now ready to move onto Chapter 3, and Tonal Ranges, Histograms and Levels.

Hopefully, by the time I reach the end of the book, I will be far better informed on extracting some more of the 'hidden power' of P/shop.

Dave

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I use a hardware monitor calibrator that adjust for ambient light levels... wasted too much money on color printing int he past so it was a worthwhile and relatively cheap investment...

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I've been considering the Spyder 2 Express, which seems to get good reviews.

Wharehiouse Express are selling it for £56.99 inc delivery. The average price seems to be around £63 + delivery.

Dave

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That's a great price :shock: I hadn't even investigated these as I thought monitor calibration would cost me in the region of £200.

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Never heard of hardware calibration. I used to calibrate gas analysers in MOT stations.

What exactly, does this gadget do, and how?

Ron. :)

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Hi Ron,

I use a pantone Huey...

Its placed on the screen whilst the software places various colour and intensity swatches under the sensor. Teh Software knows what the RGB mix of the colors should be and the sensor measures whats beign displayed...the software can then work out a custom color profile for the monitor. I addition the huey has an ambient light sensor so it can adjust the monitor in realtime (usually set it to do it every few secs) to cope with changes in ambient lighting..

Ideally I need to upgrade to the pro version which has multi monitor support

Billy...

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Ron, the 'Spyder' work in the same way a the 'Huey', and like the 'Huey' comes in models that are aimed at the amateur digtital imager (us :) ), costing not too much money, to those costing a lot of money, and aimed at the professional.

Alan, the more I read this book, the more I like it, and am continuing to learn new things. All I have to do, is to try and remember it all :) .

Dave

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Thanks Dave, Peter.

I need to learn Acquire, image, and process before I spend money on Hardware Calibration.

I read of one guy who could not read text on is screen after performing a calibration.

It seems he had Adobe Gamma loaded too, which caused some confusion, and a wrong calibration.. I suppose the answer is, don't allow Adobe Gamma to load with Windows.

Ron. :)

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