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The July edition of the Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready. Astronomical darkness returns to the southern part of the UK this month, and we have:

* Yet another "promising" comet
* Asteroid Ceres
* Neptune and Uranus return

I hope this helps you to fill your evenings (actually, more likely pre-dawn mornings!) enjoyably.

To pick up your free copy, just head over to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab, where you can subscribe (also free, of course) to have it emailed each month, and get archived copies.

Comet2020F3202007.thumb.jpg.7fc51d9e30eb4bc4435e11b1f7ad4af8.jpg

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Just a quick heads up Steve - I think in your editing of the newsletter you've left in the note about the Venus lunar occultation from last month

Cheers

Kerry 

 

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Posted (edited)
On 01/07/2020 at 15:07, kerrylewis said:

I think in your editing of the newsletter you've left in the note about the Venus lunar occultation from last month

Drat! I did. Thanks for letting me know; I'll correct it.

Edit: Now corrected.

Edited by BinocularSky

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A hopefull comet, I'll enjoy the read, thanks

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A bit late, but thanks for the August edition. 

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