Jump to content

Banner.jpg.39bf5bb2e6bf87794d3e2a4b88f26f1b.jpg

Is the skywatcher 127 any good


Recommended Posts

The 127 mak is mainly for lunar and planetary which it does very well for a small scope.Ideal for a small portable setup.

For looking at DSOs you would want something with a shorter focal length that gives wider views. 

Have you considered a dobsonian? Good for wide views but also good for planets. 

Edited by johninderby
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tend to be recommended for planets however the number of planets are limited. 3 of them at times and a moon just about every night oy the year. Still that makes 4 targets.

Every scope will within reason allow you to see the Moon, Jupiter and Saturn, Mars is more difficult as you need a good scope and high magnifications.

A inexpensive 90/900 achro refractor will show Saturn and rings at around 110x so an 8mm eyepiece in a 900mm focal length one. Jupiter is visible at lower magnifications quite easily.

Newtonians may not be great for planets, the secondary and associated support structure tends to reduce the overall sharpness. So yes they collect more light just maybe not the optimum internal structures for planets. For planets exclusively you need a fairly sharp image, for DSO's a newtonian is better.

As John asked: What do you want to use one for?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, Gsc1ugs said:

Well i would like to gaze at anything, even galaxy’s, looking for a few models that can do this, bit of an allrounder.  

A 15 or 20 cm dobson is usually considered a good allrounder. Keep in mind that both Jupiter and Saturn are placed fairly unfavourable for northen hemisphere observers this year and the next couple of years.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Waiting for a used Skymax 127 myself, judging from the field of view calculators online it should be usable with Jupiter and Saturn (probably needs a high magnification eyepiece for getting a large enough view, less than 9mm I guess).

The 150 model gives a bit more reach before the jump to the 180 model (which I *may* jump later).

N.F.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have the 90mm and 127mm Skywatcher Maks. They are good instruments for the money with very sharp optics. The 127mm is excellent on the moon and planets and is also good for the brighter DSOs. There is a bit of flaring from bright stars just outside the field of view but it is minimal. This is probably due to the baffling. This is my grab and go scope which I have mounted on a Skywatcher AZ4 mount. Replace the diagonal with a decent dielectric and get some plossl eyepieces. I use a 32mm plossl eyepiece to give the widest field of view.

It just frames the full moon with a crop frame camera which can be attached directly to the back of the scope via a T adapter which screws directly to the provided rear thread.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/7703127@N07/49844940726/in/dateposted-public/

 

Have a look at an 8" Dobsonian as well- its a great all rounder

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Limerick John said:

I have the 90mm and 127mm Skywatcher Maks.

Me too. Having realised that my Astromaster 130EQ-MD was a pain to set up and use, I went for the Skymax 127 GoTo with Synscan handset. This was a vast improvement; and, shortly afterwards, I bought a second one to take to my holiday home in France.

The 127mm Mak works well for planets (including Uranus and, just about, Neptune - they look like stars, but with a bit more "body", and definitely need a tracking/GoTo mount to find them, and hold the view steady whilst you change eyepieces).

This is my grab-and-go setup

327587845_SkymaxBackpack-Annotated(R).jpg.b83b02aaa90aa4c785f2b6834f0f900d.jpg

 

3 hours ago, Limerick John said:

I use a 32mm plossl eyepiece to give the widest field of view.

Works well for me too.

Geoff

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, Gsc1ugs said:

Well i would like to gaze at anything, even galaxy’s, looking for a few models that can do this, bit of an allrounder.  

 

Probably the best " all rounder" when it comes to scopes at sensible money is a 200mm reflector on a dob Mount. Over the years the 200m reflector has probably been the best "proper" starter scope out there. And this scope will keep you entertained with numerous targets for many years. A good  200mm reflector is the best bang for buck "proper" scope available IMO 

Hope this helps 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The 127 is a stunning scope and ideal for moon and planets 🪐 and it won’t need colminating either, it’s practical to move around and well priced and was highly recommended to me by FLO  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Gsc1ugs said:

Do you have any makes models to look out for please?

The Bresser/Explore Scientific/JOC Dob is very nice as well as the Revelation/GSO Dob.  The Skywatcher/Synta Dob is a slight step down mechanically.  All are similar optically.

Before rushing out to buy an 8" Dob versus a 127 Mak, consider the vast size difference.  Where will you be observing from?  How far will you be carrying the scope?  Do you plan to transport it by hand, car, other?  Do you want to learn the sky or simply let electronics point things out to you?  What is your budget?  What is your weight lifting limit?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have one too, like mentioned above, it's a very good allrounder, lunar, planetary en brighter DSO's.

Clusters, open and globular are no problem at all, some clusters are a tight fit off course, M 31, 81, 82, 101 and many more alike are in range of this instrument, of coarse the view won't be the same as with a 10" dob, but you can't put that in a backpack.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Miguel1983 said:

the view won't be the same as with a 10" dob, but you can't put that in a backpack

My 10" Skywatcher Skyliner 250PX truss-tube Dobsonian will definitely not fit in my Mazda MX5 2-seater; all of my other systems will. I bought the Skyliner before I retired, and am glad that I did not go any larger, as I can envisage a time when I will not be able to carry the base and optical tube, the 10 yards (through a limited-width doorway, and down a small step) from my garage to my patio. 

Geoff

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Played a bit with my used Skymax 127.

Unfortunately, today I decided to upgrade the focuser (adding a TS dual speed focuser), and I managed to whack out of kilter the original focuser.

You see, the 2-inch dual speed focuser didn't fit together with the original focuser (I would guess that you want at least  a Skymax 150 for easier fit), so I removed the original one. I made the mistake of having the Mak in a vertical position, so I saw the brass (?) tube going into the OTA like a periscope 😮  , and I had to turn it over and pull it in order to extend it back.

And now, it focuses only if I push-pull the focuser tube (like a trombone), turning the focuser doesn't seem to engage the mirror anymore 😞 

I guess that will mean a visit to a repair center (let's hope that there's a repair shop in Athens)...

 

N.F.

 

  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.