Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_2021_annual.thumb.jpg.3fc34f695a81b16210333189a3162ac7.jpg

Recommended Posts

Hi, i want to get a large print (36x36inches) of an image of the moon i took.  After processing in autostakkert3, registax and lightroom i ended up with my image but i'm not sure if i've overprocessed it.  it looks great on a computer screen but if i zoom in i can see what i think you call noise(i'm new to this so i think this is what i am seeing), see attached photos.

When exporting the image in lightroom i resized it to 36x36 inches which lightroom upscales so the print will still look good(i think) for larger printing in a local shop.

My question is would this noise show up on a larger print or am i only seeing it because i have zoomed in on the computer.  The print shop said it may cost between £30 to £40 but i don't want to let them go ahead and print it only to find out i can see a load of noise as i would then have wasted my money
 

i have attached the original .tif, the processed, the enlarged processed and the zoomed in .jpg files

p.s.  i'm new to this and have been following youtube videos on processing so if anyone can help make my original.tif image better and upscaled to 36x36 inches it would be much appreciated

enlarged processed.jpg

processed.jpg

zoomed in.jpg

original.tif

Edited by cbbella
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi I've been trialing a photo enlargement software from Topaz labs (Gigapiixel AI) and have been blown away by the results;, certainly on terrestrial  photos' where I've heavily cropped an area of interest and noise is very evident. 

However after up scaling  the noise virtually disappears and the detail remains. May be worth a try (there's a 30 day trial, and the software is fully functional, and is very intuitive to use).

pc387

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Its always a good idea to look at the pixels per inch as well. The higher the PPI, the less you can see the individual pixels so the better the image will look once printed.

I would aim for at least 200-250ppi to give decent results, 300 being ideal. With your tif file, its shows at 72ppi, scaling that to 200ppi gives a print of 20x15inches roughly. At 36 inches, there will be too much pixelation :( so I wouldnt go ahead until it was scaled up.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 13/06/2020 at 14:26, CloudMagnet said:

Its always a good idea to look at the pixels per inch as well. The higher the PPI, the less you can see the individual pixels so the better the image will look once printed.

I would aim for at least 200-250ppi to give decent results, 300 being ideal. With your tif file, its shows at 72ppi, scaling that to 200ppi gives a print of 20x15inches roughly. At 36 inches, there will be too much pixelation :( so I wouldnt go ahead until it was scaled up.

thanks for pointing that out.   i thought i was doing the upscaling in lightroom - see attached screenshot.

do i scale the dpi up when stacking in autostakkert

 

dpi.jpg

Edited by cbbella
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, cbbella said:

do i scale the dpi up when stacking in autostakkert

Im not sure that is upscaling, just resizing the image to a smaller size but higher PPI. I think you will need dedicated software like what @pc387 suggested to enlarge the image at the same resolution.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/06/2020 at 08:54, pc387 said:

Hi I've been trialing a photo enlargement software from Topaz labs (Gigapiixel AI) and have been blown away by the results;, certainly on terrestrial  photos' where I've heavily cropped an area of interest and noise is very evident. 

However after up scaling  the noise virtually disappears and the detail remains. May be worth a try (there's a 30 day trial, and the software is fully functional, and is very intuitive to use).

pc387

thanks for the suggestion, i'll give that a try

cheers

Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing to bear in mind is that looking at a poster is very different to looking on a monitor.  People don't normally get up as close and aren't looking for noise.  If it looks noisy close up most people, unless they happen to be astro pixel peepers, will take a step back.  Pixelation on the other hand is a nasty artefact which will degrade the image so, as has been said above, make sure your image has an adequate pixel count.  Of course, keeping noise to a minimum is always desirable as long as it is well achieved rather than by excessive smoothing.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.