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Hi all I’m just looking for advice on upgrading telescop. At the minute I’ve got a Meade ETX 125 and had some good views with it so far. Mainly Moon Planets and brighter clusters. However I wanted to see more Galaxies and nebulas which is a much to ask for a F15 scope. 
im looking at second hand Celestron/Meade 9.25” f10 s With maybe a focal reducer and Sky-Watcher 10”-12” F4.9 dobsonians which is the better choice?

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Hello and a warm welcome to the SGL. Observing galaxies and nebulae is greatly dependent on the quality of your skies. If you have to travel to get dark skies then obviously ease of transporting the scope has to be considered. I personally would go for a trust tube Dob but to be honest I have not had much experience with an SCT.

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Posted (edited)

I agree - I think Aperture is your friend on this one so I’d say biggest Truss tube Dob you can handle. Goto might also help you find them easier and dark skies will help enormously. I went to @ollypenrice’s place I France - magical trip and still my jaw drops at what I could see there - he has a 14in sct monster that is fixed and that was amazing on galaxies in a dark sky area. Personally I wouldn’t choose an SCT for this job unless it’s 14 inch plus, making it expensive and not that practical to move  around. He had a 10 inch sct as well and comparing the views, we were both vastly underwhelmed by the 10 inch sct vs 14 inch - there was no comparison.  Depending on your budget I’d say look at a truss tube David Lakehurst dob - used or possibly skywatcher 14 inch truss tube with goto.

Steve

Edited by Trikeflyer
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Posted (edited)

Hi thanks for the comments. I live in country Durham so I’m lucky enough to have Kielder Dark Sky site nearby. Are the 2” eyepieces not really expensive for 14” dobsonian scopes I’ve seen comments about them costing upwards of £250 each which really put me off or Is there cheaper ones you can get?

Edited by StevieH

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You can get cheaper 2inch eyepieces but I think for what you want to observe 1.25 inch Wide field eyepieces will be ok. You might need a coma corrector depending on the scope f ratio - below 5 normally benefit from coma correction. 

Steve 

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I have found that my 32mm, 1.25", Plossl EP is fine for most wide-angle views with my Skyliner 250PX 10" truss-tube Dob. I have a 56mm, 2", Plossl which I use very, very, rarely. I am a big fan of the Synscan GoTo. I have been an OAP for a few years, and I would not want to lug anything much heavier from my garage to patio; about 7 metres through a doorway and down a step.

Geoff

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16 hours ago, Geoff Lister said:

I have found that my 32mm, 1.25", Plossl EP is fine for most wide-angle views with my Skyliner 250PX 10" truss-tube Dob. I have a 56mm, 2", Plossl which I use very, very, rarely. I am a big fan of the Synscan GoTo. I have been an OAP for a few years, and I would not want to lug anything much heavier from my garage to patio; about 7 metres through a doorway and down a step.

Geoff

Hi Geoff, what’s your experience of the 250XP viewing deep space and what eyepieces would you recommend please?

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2 hours ago, StevieH said:

what’s your experience of the 250XP viewing deep space and what eyepieces would you recommend please

I bought the Skyliner 250PX, with the Synscan GoTo, after several years of using the Skymax 127mm Mak, again with Synscan. I wanted the features that I enjoyed, but with the possibility of seeing fainter DSOs, and the outer planets. The Skymax is on a tripod, so there are times where it gives me visibility of lower altitude targets, obscured from the Skyliner's Dob. base, by adjacent fences and trees. The Skymax is also slightly quicker to set up, so I tend to use it for shorter sessions. However, if I expect to have a longer session, the (roughly) 4x light capture of the Skyliner, makes it worth while.

Initially, I found the Synscan alignment process often suggested second stars that were behind buildings, fences or trees; when viewed from my normal observing position. I spent a few hours with the PC program "Stellarium" and produced a table of 14 of the brightest stars, and for dusk in the middle of each month of the year, noted the rough azimuth and altitude of 3, 4, or 5 of these stars, giving good azimuth and altitude separation, so that the Synscan software could remove most of the alignment errors.

I added a bubble level to the base, and use a small wedge under one of the feet to get the base level before I power up. This is not strictly required, but I have found it makes the auto-slew to the second star more accurate, and improves long-duration tracking.

When I bought my Skymax, there was a special discount, from OVL (the Skywatcher main importer), for a purchase of a cased set of Celestron Plossl eyepieces and coloured filters. I tend to use these also with the 250PX, although the 8mm and 6mm eyepieces have very short eye relief, so are difficult to use; so I tend to use the 13mm Plossl and a x2 Barlow instead. The 8-24mm zoom (sold under various brand names including Celestron and Skywatcher) is a cost-effective way of adding a range of eyepieces. My Baader one is much more expensive - possibly a later purchase when funds permit. For most targets, I start with the 32mm Plossl, then the zoom to find the best clarity/magnification setting, and then a fixed eyepiece close to the optimum for the seeing conditions.

Geoff

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