Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_31.thumb.jpg.b7a41d6a0fa4e315f57ea3e240acf140.jpg

Recommended Posts

I'm totally new to astronomy and somehow am amazingly interested in it. I never learned constellations as a kid, and since i'm about to buy my first telescope (SW Hermitage 130/650) in a month or so I figured I should learn the skies with my own eyes first. I was so enormously surpised that I could actually see a constellation with just my eyes and i'm mad no one told me ever ūüėõ (With 10x50 binoculars was way too zoomed-in)

A totally new world opened up for me. I tried navigating and finding more using some cool apps that really helped me a lot!

Here's a picture of Ursa Minor (Galaxy S10), my first one ever. I'm so hyped to get my scope.

Also thanks to everyone for helping me this week in finding out which telescope to get and explaining some terms. I couldn't be any more happy :)

Screenshot_20200523-232834_Gallery.jpg

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice picture, although it is Ursa Major not Minor. Absolutely, your eyes are the best thing to use to learn the constellations, even binoculars are to much power for that. The Milky Way too is best see with the naked eye from a dark site. Simple pleasures but amazing all the same.

Glad you are enjoying the hobby and getting sorted with a scope.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Stu said:

Nice picture, although it is Ursa Major not Minor. Absolutely, your eyes are the best thing to use to learn the constellations, even binoculars are to much power for that. The Milky Way too is best see with the naked eye from a dark site. Simple pleasures but amazing all the same.

Glad you are enjoying the hobby and getting sorted with a scope.

Ahhhh a minute after I posted I saw there also existed Ursa Major and was so confused which one I photographed. Thanks for bringing clarity :D

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the Universe!

I started many years ago, just me and my eyes! I loved discovering new constellations and in the days before gross light pollution and with young eyes, I didn't need a telescope to be blown away...literally!

There is something for everyone up there. No competition! 

Baby steps are best, you don't want to miss the best bits in the rush for technology and gadgets. It's taken me 45 years to dip a toe into imaging but the other night while my camera was clicking away, I spent a lot of time just looking up. No telescope to distract me. I rediscovered a couple of constellations I'd lost track of!

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thing is with Astronomy it’s such a vast hobby to learn and once Neil Armstrong said? One small step and so on it’s the small steps we take which leads to the bigger picture and the small steps we take first leads to a bigger gain

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

There are very few moments that will stick with you like the moment you look up and say to yourself, "wow, I see it now!"

Here in Florida, Orion is amazing and easy to see during the right time of the year.

He's gone for a while because another easy one has chased him across the sky. That's Scorpios. 

One word of warning, if the constellations make you smile, you better have a chair nearby when you turn your telescope to Saturn.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

The trouble many have is that imaging shows up so many more stars that it makes picking out the constellations or specific stars difficult unless you really know what to look for.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, MarkAR said:

The trouble many have is that imaging shows up so many more stars that it makes picking out the constellations or specific stars difficult unless you really know what to look for.

Yes! This! I shouldnt have brightened up this image so much ūü§£

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Goldenmole
      Hi everyone! I would just quickly like to ask people for any suggestions for targets to observe, as i would really like to know your faves are. Also, i'd like to ask, what's all this 'reputation' stuff about. Apparently at the moment i'm a Nebula.
    • By SpaceDave
      Hello all. I’ve tried a few times in the last month to image Mars but have had very little success. Although a decent size, Mars is very blurry and wobbly. I am fairly new to the hobby, but I would say it appears to be poor seeing conditions. 
      I am using a Celestron 6SE and Canon 600D. I have tried 2x and 3x Barlow. I focus using a bahtinov mask (on stars). I used movie crop mode on various ISOs and exposures, stacking at least 3000 frames (keeping the best 1%, 2%, 5%, etc).
      Is Mars too far away now? Or am I underestimating how rarely you get a night of good seeing? How do you find out when the best seeing will be?
    • By Goldenmole
      Good day fellow gazers at the sky! I recently joined and i would just like to say how wonderful everyone is (a special shout out to George Gearless)!
       Can anyone suggest a good reflector within my budget shown in the title? While i'm here i'd just like to say about the app, Nightshift. It is proffesional, clear and tellls you when to observe, and what you can see, for the next year! It also pinpoints your location exactly, so it is really accurate.https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.waddensky.nightshift. Anyway, that's me done! Thank you all so much for your time
    • By Goldenmole
      Hello everyone! I hope you are all doing well! I recently joined this forum for the express purpose of answering this question: Why does Mars look like a simple star through my telescope? I have a Starsense Explorer LT 80AZ refractor with a 10mm, 25mm and 2x Barlow lens, and my telescope has a max magnification of 189x! So why is it, on a pretty clear winters night, that the mighty Mars, the Red Planet , looks like a humble star. I love stars (who the hell doesn't) but i rather hoped to see a planet. What am i doing wrong? AM i doing something wrong or is my telescope inadequate (i doubt it though). I use the 10mm plus the Barlow, and still nothing. Is this just how Mars looks through a telescope like mine? Or maybe i'm not looking at Mars at all. Although, according to my research, the Red Planet currently resides in the constellation of Aries. Correct? Please. please answer my question as it is driving me up the wall. Plus, if anyone has the time, could someone recommend a good astronomy app, other than the starsense one, that you can just point at the sky? Thank you so much for reading this. Have a lovely day.
    • By SuburbanMak
      My objectives on getting a new Skymax 127 were purely visual observing having parked imaging for a far-off time when I have time on my hands but, on taking delivery of a Baader Hyperion 8-24mm Zoom and fixed Hyperion 24mm 68 degree, I noticed a photo on the box and was intrigued..
      My DSLR hardly gets an outing these days with an iPhone camera always on hand but I thought it has to be worth a go so I ordered a Baader M43-T2 thread ring and a Nikon T ring to connect it all together, perhaps this could be quick and dirty way of getting into basic imaging at low cost. It all connects incredibly simply in seconds and although I'm only using the supplied SW plastic-bodied diagonal feels nice and secure when its on the 'scope.
      It makes quite a chunky load on the little AZ GTi mount but with the Vixen bar at its extreme balance point the mount performs fine at what I reckon is the very top end of its published 5KG payload. 
      Initially I just wanted to establish if there's a decently bright and focusable image that makes it to the CCD & given the absence of stars due to current weather and this being a bit of an operation to put together, a daylight test seemed a good idea.  I have a very handy church spire about 500m away (about the maximum possible distance from a church in Winchester) and poking it all out of an upper storey window in failing light on an extremely windy Saturday I captured the orb below on a  2.5 s exposure - (distance view included for scale, the spire is centre frame partially in the trees). 
      Verdict: focussing is tricky, as you can see, but on the Skymax 127 there's definitely plenty of leeway either side with the focuser which answered my initial exam question, it just takes some focus to focus!
      I've ordered the Baader heavy duty quick release system pictured on the box which should make this much safer and more practical  in the dark and cold, although it does make this not quite the bargain-basement option it is with just the 2 rings.
      Given the light & time limitations of the test Id say its definitely worth trying on nighttime targets, if the clouds ever clear...
      Will post any results up here but this looks like a really promising way of resurrecting a Nikon D90 that has been on the dole for a while (it shoots RAW video too!)
      Any hints, tips or suitable targets appreciated!







×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.