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As you so rightly say Dave, a PROPER comet at last !!! :icon_biggrin:

Would be naked eye if the sky was a touch darker I reckon but really good with the binoculars.

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The    W__I__D__E    picture .    Get the IMAX monitor out!! Stitch along the horizon.   Could not wait any longer to get Venus and Uranus....they were tantalisingly close to rising..otherwise I

So many amazing captures! Weather forecast for the next few days and it's ever growing distance from the sun meant last night was probably my last opportunity to see. Set out to Beachy Head to se

Bit more fun with the Comet, I went by a dam in the mountains because I wanted to get the reflection on the water.    Plus the views from a dark site beat city viewing every time!

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Set my alarm to see if I could catch Comet Neowise I the dawn sky. Just caught it and am strangely emotional. Bright around 1st magnitude with what looks like a double tail very low in the NE. Fabulous view with 8x42 Bins. Should be amazing as it moves into the evening sky next weekend. If you have a good NE horizon worth setting your alarm to catch it in the morning

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Just watched it fading into the dawn sky, hope it stays in one piece.

Tried to get a picture but had to lean out the bedroom window and handhold it so not expecting too much.

Dave

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You got it though Dave.

I'm off to bed. So excited though. 60 year old bloke hopping about the flower beds like a kid with his binoculars, tripod, camera etc. What a lark !

 

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Just catch it on my 8x40.

3h30am naked eye. Direct views. Tail noticeable. 

Once located with binoculars is quite obvious with naked eye. 

3h31 Great tail. ~40 '  that is a bit bigger than a full moon. Quite broad.arc-shaped West Side, straight slightly fainter east side- 8x40 mag. 1.7

3h44am averted vision. Started to be consumed by background dawn light. 

A beauty! 

 

 

Edited by Scosmico
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Got up at 3:10am and went out with the 10x50 bins. Found Comet Neowise almost straight away so rushed back inside to get the refractor and camera. I've never seen a comet like this before with such a pronounced tail. It was like a fan almost like to two tails coming out either side. Quick edit on an image below taken through my 80mm refractor.

E3CE6632-4A79-415A-B7C0-093C133DFE48_1_201_a.thumb.jpeg.97f011987f634640066332f08f38f918.jpeg

 

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1 hour ago, KevS said:

Just got back in from a trip to the top of the Lincolnshire Wolds, very spectacular through the 8 x 42 binos. Broad arc of tail slightly fish tailed at extremities, longer at west side than east. Late out of bed so it was starting to fade with dawn. But what a sight.

Just seen the first comet in mi damn life with those binos. Absolutely gorgeous! I even managed to see it naked eye, without the 8x42 during 15 minutes, unfortunately it went into thin clouds and when it was coming out, the twilight was bright enough to hide it. Still a marvelous sight! I'll show you pictures later... 

Edited by HaleBopp2007
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Just woke up from a quick hours nap before work, 1st thing i thought about..........Neowise. My wifr thinks i am mad, but you have just to love astronomy!

What a great mornings viewing!

Edited by Pete Presland
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689455167_NEOWISEjpg.thumb.jpg.b578cd4c277c90c71e5275f6aa0ed9b3.jpg

Registax stack of 34 x 1 second images, Canon 450D at ISO400, Vixen ED 114 600mm, at 3.45 BST this morning. Easily seen with bins including a definite tail, just visible through the murk with the naked eye, provided you knew where to look.  The twin outgassing structures were clearly visible in 6x30 bins.  It seemed about the same brightness as theta Aurigae to me, which puts it at around magnitude 2.6, but this was only at an altitude of 8 degrees.

Edited by Hallingskies
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Not much to add to the above reports but extremely chuffed to have seen this comet after my preparation yesterday.

At first I thought clouds in just the wrong place would be a problem but they began to break up and there it was. Clear through the binoculars- almost stellar but the tail was immediately obvious. Brighter than I expected  and managed to get it in the scope too. Bright core with fan shaped tail but any longer portions now being swallowed up by the dawn.

What a treat to see a ‘real’ comet hanging in the sky just as it should.

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Gnarr-boo--hiss!!!

I was up at 3.00, but missed it totally, even with binos.   Must have been hidden in broad twi-light.

My NE horizon is not too bad. Maybe my latitude counts against me at the moment.

Well done everybody for seeing it and reporting back.

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28 minutes ago, Craney said:

Gnarr-boo--hiss!!!

I was up at 3.00, but missed it totally, even with binos.   Must have been hidden in broad twi-light.

My NE horizon is not too bad. Maybe my latitude counts against me at the moment.

Well done everybody for seeing it and reporting back.

I bagged it at 3.45 when it was a bit higher, but I used go-to and saw it first through the finderscope.  I would have struggled without knowing where to look - it’s a bit like trying to see Venus in the daytime.  Easy if you know exactly where.

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Wow, these reports are wonderful!

Think I'll give this a go tomorrow morning, though as I live in a valley and I don't drive I'm not very hopeful of a view for a few days. The south coast of Cornwall is great for the Milky Way, but not so good for something low to the north! Anyway, I'll walk out to a park a short distance away where the horizon is slightly lower.

The forecast does look good for tomorrow morning, so fingers-crossed...

Regards, Mike.

Edited by mcrowle
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Bedroom And Living Room Astronomy

Comet NEWISE is probably the easiest comet I have observed in the past 34 years! I got ready with all my gear, binoculars,  camera and heavy telephoto lens and all kind of straps holding these on me.

It was 03:00 and I already had packed up from a beautiful observing session of Saturn, Moon and Jupiter conjunction using Meade LX200 in the living room, set up on a table. No tripod.

Just went to say to wife that I am out, but then had a look out of the bedroom window and it was there, a beautiful mini Hale-Bop with a bright, star-like nucleus and ghostly coma and tail!

 So stayed in bed and used the mobile phone to capture this.

I have observed many comets in the past 34 years of observing, writing and teaching astronomy, and this one ranks among the best on the top.

6BB6A5E8-FAA5-4AFD-A02E-3B12027F3477.jpeg

Edited by Dippy
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I've been away from astronomy for quite a long time, so my one and only decent comet in my lifetime was Hale-Bopp. I was 10 when comet Bennett (C/1969 Y1) was around but I don't remember seeing it. I'm hoping to see this one - the awkward thing is the view to NE is blocked, so I would need to walk to the car park for the canal at the top of my road.  

Edited by Tenor Viol
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