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Martin Meredith

Vorontsov-Velyaminov interacting galaxies

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This thread is dedicated to observations from The catalogue of interacting galaxies by Vorontsov-Velyaminov

Brief bio: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_Vorontsov-Velyaminov

Many of these are fascinating systems to observe. There are plenty to go round, some 2014 in all! There is some overlap with other catalogues, notably Arp.

Here is a CSV file listing them that I have put together (with some pain it must be said) from the original catalogue available at Vizier. If anyone has any further resources, please share them and I will post them here, or feel free to add them below.

VV_reduced.csv

 

Other resources can be found here: http://www.sai.msu.su/sn/vv/

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Posted (edited)

VV 1537

This is a field I came across completely by chance a couple of night ago while scanning the charts. I enjoy looking at odd/random groupings and  this region of the sky has a distant (1.2 billion light year) galaxy group, Abell 1541, close to a couple of NGC galaxies, and a member of the VV catalogue. I operate a small sensor (field of view about 2/3 of degree on the long edge) but it is amazing what one can cram in! 

I had no idea what to expect and that made the observation all the more exciting. This is an image from that first encounter to give an idea of the overall configuration. It is an unusual field. In some ways from an aesthetic point of view it is arguably a bit of a mess! There is just too much going on and the objects are of such different types that it is more like three separate views. But in each case there are hints of something fascinating. Those two face on spirals, NGC 4411 and 4411B, type Sc and SABc respectively, are listed at 64 and 66 MLYs so must presumably be ripe for interaction. Likewise the foetus-like NGC 4410 with its very bright apparent double core. I also thought I caught a hint of some bridge between IC 790 and the 'next galaxy down'.

1131855982_VV1537annot.png.64c06e71bd3e848b36d603eb710b06b9.png

 

When I read more about what I was seeing, I realised I would have to come back for a deeper look. I rarely observe for more than 15 minutes, but some objects merit much longer, and there is so much going on here that it certainly falls into that category for me. So here is a longer view from last night, oriented with N upwards (unfortunately I had to dispense with Abell 1541 on this occasion in the interests of bringing the main objects into the centre of the image).

 

960705138_VV153714Apr20_23_36_01.png.078be353351ca8541b5f3a9ab4599756.png

 

 

 

337299448_VV153714Apr20_23_29_44.png.d91d609b4b973affb044bde943aa9417.png

 

One accidental benefit is that a very low surface brightness galaxy has crept it at around 3 oclock (the faint smudge, more easily seen on the negative image). This is VC 869 (I imagine the VC designation corresponds to the Virgo Cluster Catalogue), also known as PGC (LEDA) 40640. The listed surface brightness is 24.4. It is a dwarf elliptical or irregular galaxy, first mentioned in this 1956 paper [1]. 

Ignoring the VV group for a moment, the additional observing time has brought out a host of detail in NGC 4411 and 4411B. The Sc type of NGC 4411 shows up in much looser, almost 'S'-like spiral arms, compared to the moderately-tight arms of NGC 4411B. The latter has a faint halo, lacking in NGC 4411. A great many knots are also apparent in the arms of both galaxies. I see a hint of a bar in NGC 4411.

Now to VV 1537 (supposedly the purpose of this post!). According to [2] this is actually a group of four galaxies in obvious interaction as part of a larger group of 12 galaxies. It is worth taking a look at their Figure 1 as it makes the features I'm going to mention quite clear. The paper also mentions why this is not a member of the Hickson catalogue...

Taking the line of 'three' galaxies from right to left:

rightmost: the cashew-shaped entity is a very close pair of galaxies (NGC 4410A/B) that are locked in interaction
middle: IC790 is a Sab type, also known as the C-member of the 4410 group
left: this is PGC 40736, type Sa, known as the D-member

As far as I can make out, there are two bridges of stars here, as well as two tails. The clearest bridge snakes between the C and D members, while a fainter bridge runs between A/B and C. Then each of the A and B members appear to have tail curving out in opposite directions from the centre of their interaction. These features are clearer on the negative image. They bring to mind the Antennae galaxies, but on a smaller scale.

thanks for looking

Martin


[1] http://articles.adsabs.harvard.edu/pdf/1956AJ.....61...69R
[2] https://www.aanda.org/articles/aa/pdf/2008/26/aa8119-07.pdf


 

Edited by Martin Meredith
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Hi Martin,

Superb write up and shots. So much going on in this area.

Mike

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Bootes VV 223. A friend pointed out this faint pair, actually a triple. It is a triple with a tight pair.  Mag 16.5.

1376192678_VV_223_UGC_9103.BOOTES_2020.4_19_22_19.59photoshop.thumb.png.4872591abd7f4d64b310d42cc5634e38.png

In contrast here is VV 678 in Coma. At first glance I thought two, then three, maybe four galaxies. Actually classified as NN in the VV catalogue = disrupted nest (group of three or more). I would suggest there are four galaxies - mag 15.7.

1956683101_VV_678.COMA_2020.4.19_22_12.33inset.thumb.png.8932accf4651cf03261fb49e72668491.png

 

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Interesting objects Mike. VV223 looks vaguely like a pair of headphones upside down. I like the idea of a nest of galaxies in VV 678. From your blow-up there could be any number between 3 and 5. Looks pretty challenging. Coma is well-placed -- just need a clear spell.

Martin

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Here is a VV beauty in Camelopardalis - VV 439. It is classed as M = one satellite on the primary branch. I cannot decide which blob of fuzz would be the satellite. Quite clearly a spiral with a bar (SBc)

The one at 3 o clock might be it, but is it a star? There is a blob at the end of the lower spiral. Also there is a blob to the left of the nucleus. Or what about the blob at 12 0 clock?

Mike

VV_439_UGC_4028.CAM_2020.4.21_22_24_04.thumb.png.5ec161db2388c3791ecfd286af60c9ed.png462312170_VV_439_UGC_4028.CAM_2020.4.21_22_24.04cropped.png.51aa1ee84da20768fd348338ce04b3e6.png

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Here is another very interesting VV in Camelopardalis. VV 539 - UGC 3906. Classed as PK = pair in contact. Both classed as spirals. Wonderful tidal plume forming with I presume what are star forming regions (knots) in this plume. Mike

VV_539_UGC_3906.CAM_2020.4.21_21_58_26.thumb.png.7deb0ccb1e36896f54ead9c3b0ba6bc3.png

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VV 644. Now this pairing in Camelopardalis is a pair of two spirals coalescing (classed as PC in the VV catalogue). They are certainly messed up - looks like 4 galaxy cores to me. Stars must be flying about in many directions. Mike

VV_644_UGC_3852.CAM_2020.4.21_22_14_04.thumb.png.19c91b2a85e75d7b27e99f66104dea5e.png1337514356_VV_644_UGC_3852.CAM_2020.4.21_22_14.04cropped.png.0aadede40ed7de7c6abf72b5fa5c938b.png

 

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Firstly VV274/275 in Bootes, mag 16 and I believe a mag 19 in there. Could definitely do with more time spent on this, another one to revisit another time.

Then secondly Rose 12, from the Rose Compact Galaxy Catalogue, in Canes Venatici. Mags 15-17.

:)

 

FF1D8567-58E6-478B-9A32-36C1C6763DBA.jpeg

6E128D34-31FA-430A-BA6E-52CFFF2171AB.jpeg

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Like you I find the VV catalogue interesting. Good to see your shots. Are Rose galaxies also VV galaxies? Mike

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2 hours ago, Mike JW said:

Like you I find the VV catalogue interesting. Good to see your shots. Are Rose galaxies also VV galaxies? Mike

Hi Mike,

Yeah I like the VV catalogue, a printed version would be a great thing to have. I find them interesting and I enjoy the challenge, make a nice change from the usual suspects. There’s just so much in deep space that gets overlooked.

I think some of the VV do cross over into the Rose catalogue, but the Rose catalogue is small with only 33 targets. It’s said to be more of a challenge than the Hickson groups, with an 18”+ scope recommended for observing.

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VV 224 Arp 242 (NGC 4676 A & B)

An object or pair of objects that is in both the Vorontsov-Velyaminov and Arp catalogues.

This pair of galaxies is known as The Mice

NGC 4676A is the one with the straight bright tail. It’s about 304 Mly away. Classed as a type SB0-a - spiral galaxy with bar.

NGC 4676B at a similar distance is classed as S0-a - lenticular galaxy.

The Arp catalogue entry categorises the pair as ‘having the appearance of fission’. There’s clearly some tidal action going on suggesting a collision and interaction. A complete merger may result.  

 

117967321_Arp242VV224NGC4676AB28Apr20_20_54_33.jpg.3590e51bf9056a56ea1890f822fcb4d6.jpg

 

1209092640_Arp242VV224NGC4676AB28Apr20_21_13_55.jpg.304ae231516fd5f68a6fe174c4906fa1.jpg

 

Cheers

Bill

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quote: <Yeah I like the VV catalogue, a printed version would be a great thing to have. I find them interesting and I enjoy the challenge, make a nice change from the usual suspects. There’s just so much in deep space that gets overlooked.>

Here are 2 PDF from http://www.faintfuzzies.com/DownloadableObservingGuides2.html

VVCatalogue - Vorontsov-Velyaminov Interacting Galaxies -Part1-v1.pdf VVCatalogue - Vorontsov-Velyaminov Interacting Galaxies -Part2-v1.pdf

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Hi Roelb, don't forget Martin's VV list at the start of the thread. Mike

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16 hours ago, Mike JW said:

Hi Roelb, don't forget Martin's VV list at the start of the thread. Mike

Yes I don't

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VV 364, VV 356, VV 1815, VV 1860, VV 1862

One of the pleasures of the VV journey is it offers a chance to go to less known areas, see some wonderful sights, to be faced with some difficult location challenges and a view of some tiny galaxy pairs or triples.......

Last night there I was in Hercules using RA/DEC co-ordinates for apparent date with absolutely no idea of what I might see. Conditions were poor, much moonlight. I have had to spend a bit of time in Photoshop to achieve a reasonable image ( 5 mins of messing about for each image). The shots below are in the "photographically poor galaxy section" - difficult to locate and to be sure I was on the right galaxy but fun to get a result (not all are as good as I would like). In each shot are various other distant galaxies.

Mike

124587253_VV_364.NGC6166.HERCULES_2020.5.3_00_40.18INSET.thumb.png.fb987f4d00bdac88bb6fefc70bb6058f.png

 

1489576446_VV_556.HERCULES_2020.5.3_01_07.22INSET.thumb.png.c41649a68332443ef46841ce026f8612.png

 

1685548898_VV_1815.HERCULES_2020.5.3_00_48.26INSET.thumb.png.fbd8407630f9fe19f302f36a7d591a11.png

 

1762800159_VV_1860.HERCULES_2020.5.3_00_57.23INSET.thumb.png.489684c71a21d734f20a40edc60128a8.png

 

1839029358_VV_1862.HERCULES_2020.5.3_01_26.43INSET.thumb.png.ebcbf4e280fdc3cbeea900260510dab7.png

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Nice haul there Mike -- not sure how I missed them until now.  VV 364 is particularly intriguing.

Here's a very appealing VV group, VV 170 in Virgo. It reminds me of Hickson 50 (or is 55?), except there are just 4 galaxies in this chain.

As a bonus we also have Shakhbazian 357 in the same field of view. In fact, the SHK galaxies are the central part of Abell 1773, estimated to be around 1.1 billion LYs distant. The VV chain is less than half that distance. The faint galaxy just off to the edge of the chain seems to belong to the Abell cluster, so the proximity is accidental. Also, one of the 4 VV 'galaxies' may well a stellar interloper?

While VV and particularly SHK galaxies have a reputation for being faint, this is just a 1 minute exposure (6 x 10s) with my 8" Newt. Even so, I'm just about picking up a mag 19.9 galaxy. The attached chart helps in identifying the fainter reaches.

 

1765194434_SHK35728May20_21_58_24.png.4fcd8f60ef9f71f41f537d67f3863251.png

 

 

VIR3549.pdf

 

Martin 

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Hi Martin. Nice one. Always enjoy a 'two for one' As is often the case, the capture shows the 'power' of the EEVA technique - that is a result to enjoy/observe/ponder in as close to 'live' viewing as possible. It would have taken maybe 20 minutes or more to ID these objects visually in a big dob, which of course would have a much smaller fov. What a bargain you got - all achieved in one minute. Like the idea of including the reference chart.

To me the SHK group is an arrow pointing down with a chunky arrow head and a slightly curved shaft.

Mike

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9th June, unexpected gap coming through so what do you do on a bright summers night? I set up the 15/ultrastar with no particular targets in mind and took a look at the Pocket Sky Atlas and decided to go for bright galaxies as shown in the atlas and what a lovely surprise I had.

NGC 4618 popped onto the screen - star forming regions, lovely spiral shape and just one obvious big arm. Further looking made me wonder if this galaxy was being disrupted because of the star forming regions. Reading up about this barred spiral (SBm) tells me that its neighbour NGC 4625 is gravitationally interacting with it. This galaxy is classified as SBm pec, meaning it is being severely miss-shapen. No doubt it is already losing out to its somewhat bigger neighbour which in time will finish it off and possibly form a ring galaxy in the process. It is also a one armed galaxy with a bar. Together this pair are known as VV 73.

However NGC 4618 is also Arp 23, so there I am in the bright summer sky just after midnight spotting VV73, two one armed galaxies, and Arp 23. Nice!

Below is the shot using starlight live and also close ups from Jocular which I was running at the same time. I forgot to adjust the Jocular close ups to match the orientation of the SLL wider shot.

Mike

NGC_4618.CVN_2020.6.9_00_17_26.thumb.png.b7d8a76aa45c11218bbc5ed451b81a8c.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

193244615_NGC461812Jun20_18_18_28.jpg.28a14ee3ba768edec0b58249031bc1e5.jpg426301047_NGC462512Jun20_18_17_49.jpg.690f9d9c8eec9565e5d4c904eab0717a.jpg

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Having just posted the above I remembered I had visited VV 170 and SHK 357 as per Martin's post. Mike

1674494775_SHK357andVV17012Jun20_19_32_04.jpg.2b15f73b5380e49f9d3e5d5beb196fd3.jpg

 

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July 13th whilst waiting for Comet F3 (Neowise) to clear some cloud I took a look at VV galaxies in Ophiuchus.  Stars are a bit elongated.  The camera cable got caught up and I forgot to check the focus after it got snagged. It made for a delightful tour.

1673792141_VV53713Jul20_15_39_43.thumb.jpg.4c1746c6c9ef2feea200886656c8a3ac.jpg1480357430_VV61713Jul20_15_23_31.thumb.jpg.e9d5b8b6f9b899783c367d497838abbd.jpg

1102435808_VV77813Jul20_15_35_21.thumb.jpg.2323a933e77d5a9b80a0720c42da0b7e.jpg376331391_VV82013Jul20_15_06_46.thumb.jpg.a41e8e597f06d6ff44d337cf199e4c28.jpg

1775313120_VV179513Jul20_14_58_01.thumb.jpg.6ccbd44d20da09d17402ff9dc9b5faf5.jpg1179212917_VV182113Jul20_15_03_31.thumb.jpg.49183c544c9f587508675f4041ff6c20.jpg

586294856_VV183713Jul20_15_27_35.thumb.jpg.ce9221d6316951bcb80927219d285995.jpg

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Some wonderful objects there Mike. I particularly like VV537 (somewhat reminiscent of the 'Bug' planetary nebula) and VV 617. I'm surprised this latter one is not better known, what with those very clear loops. Hoping for a clear night soon to take a look at these myself.

Martin

 

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Hi Martin, I enjoyed this tour of the VV galaxies in Oph. As usual I had no idea what I might find. Agree that 537 and 617 are the best. I really should visit these again but they are setting and getting too low.

VV 537 (NGC 6570) is SBm - the bar is easily visible in my shot. At the end of the spiral arm going off to the left is the galaxy it is interacting (decent images show a nucleus at this point) with and hence causing the disruption. My shot would suggest it is a two arm spiral. VizieR gives it a N classification = three or members in a tight group. Very hard to identify other possible galaxy nucleus.

VV 617 (NGC 6240) is also given the N designation. It is a Seyfert 2 Galaxy (bright core and bright in the infra red - a powerful black hole lurks at the centre) and has a double nucleus.

VV 778 (UGC10868) is classified as PDb = distant pair with a bridge (just got a hint of this)

VV 820 are a PK = pair in contact. Both elliptical galaxies.

VV 1795 are a pair of spirals in contact. (PK).

VV 1821 are a pair of spirals in contact (PK).

VV 1837 (UGC 10797) SB (probably) VV designation M = one satellite galaxy. Aladin shows a bridge between the two: should it now be classified as PDb?

Noting my poor stars - need to double check collimation and I might as well clean up the corrector plate on the C11.

Mike

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