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alanjgreen

New Supernova targets for April 2020

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Posted (edited)

With clear nights forecast next week and the moon getting later to rise 😀, I have done some SN research this morning to id some targets for next week...

Here are some scans of my research notes and star charts for use next week...

I will be targeting the following new SN:

  1. AT2020ftl, NGC4277, Mag 14.9
  2. SN2020dko, NGC5258, Mag 16.6
  3. AT2020enm, IC1222, Mag 16.7
  4. SN2020fqv, NGC4568 (Siamese Twins), Mag 15.3
  5. SN2020fcw, NGC5635, Mag 16.1
  6. SN2020ees, NGC5157, Mag 16.5

sn-p1.jpg.db34d72926285f152acf159570e1fa71.jpg sn-p2.jpg.7fe53d6026c31b01467a80fc85349704.jpg sn-p3.jpg.7bda68b1378cec1a305a260954fa5b7f.jpg

Happy hunting...

Alan

Edited by alanjgreen
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Those are some properly faint targets!

Won’t stop me trying though.

Thanks for posting.

Paul

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Supernova are "super" to spot. The contrast between the point of light and the fuzzy galaxy is pretty special.

I might have a chance with the 14.9 one.

Mark

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Thanks Alan.

Good to know they are there even if they are beyond most of us.

Mag 14.7 is as faint as I've got with my 12 inch scope from home so I may have a shout at the mag 14.9 one if a really good night comes along. At least it is in a relatively bright galaxy !

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Thought I'd grab a quick sub of NGC4277 using the 127 Mak to get a better idea of what was going on.  Even given its somewhat narrow field of view there are bucketloads of galaxies there!

James

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19 minutes ago, JamesF said:

Thought I'd grab a quick sub of NGC4277 using the 127 Mak to get a better idea of what was going on.  Even given its somewhat narrow field of view there are bucketloads of galaxies there!

James

It's not called "The Realm of the Galaxies" for nothing !

Hope you get a decent result :smiley:

Blooming clouds are really annoying here tonight - just get the scope on something and then it's gone :rolleyes2:

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7 minutes ago, John said:

Blooming clouds are really annoying here tonight

It was very cloudy here earlier.  I didn't think I was going to get out at all.  Much better now though.  Looks like the clear sky is probably heading your way, too.

James

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It is forecast to get clearer as the night wears on but I'm probably not going to stick it out.

There are some decent nights forecast over the next 7 days with the moon rising in the early hours so hopefully darker skies for DSOs.

 

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SN2020ftl looks quite bright.. Thanks for the inspiration!

 

 

SN2020ftl 9x120s C11Edge IDAS D1 DDL raw.jpg

SN2020ftl 9x120s C11Edge IDAS D1 DDL annotated.jpg

SN2020ftl 9x120s C11Edge IDAS D1 DDL edit.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Here are last nights results - three successes and one fail.

Note that AT2020ftl has brightened to mag 14.4.

Edited by alanjgreen

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Think I managed to get SN2020ftl tonight:

 

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Looks like we have further candidates to check out:

1. SN2020ekk, UGC10528, Mag 16.7

2.jpg.20072138d653dbc2a49170406c068bfe.jpg

 

2. AT2020gdw, NGC5111, Mag 15.8

3.jpg.796ef675019a0618117b1aab28ffa216.jpg

 

3. AT2020gpe, NGC6214, Mag 16.2

1.jpg.e81fd2dfafaab8f546e2b63f05053a80.jpg

 

I have also had a couple more success stories, here is the summary:

AT2020ftl, NGC4277, observed 11 & 13 April

SN2020dko, NGC5258, observed 13 April

AT2020enm, IC1222, failed so far

SN2020fqv, NGC4568 Siamese Twins, observed 11 & 13 April

SN2020fcw, NGC5635, observed 11 & 13 April

SN2020ees, NGC5157, observed 13 April

 

Best of luck,

Alan

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Thanks for these reports Alan :thumbright:

AT2020ftl is the only one that is within my grasp here with my 12 inch, unless one of the others does something interesting, but I've really enjoyed observing that one over the past 2 nights. Great part of the sky to have a decent aperture on as well :icon_biggrin:

 

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Posted (edited)

Here is my report of another night of SN hunting. Conditions were not as good as two nights back but I did manage to observe SN2020ekk  & SNAT2020gpe  which were new targets identified yesterday...

 

Alan

Edited by alanjgreen
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Posted (edited)

New supernovae target in NGC3643 named 2020hvf discovered 21/4/20.

Brightness is now reported at mag 14.4

Image here 2020hvf_DE_C202004262053.jpg

Good luck,

Alan

Edited by alanjgreen
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