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Virgo group galazies: Siamese Twins and M58


gorann
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Here is a bunch of Virgo cluster galaxies. The twin galaxies are in the process of colliding and merging with each other with the highest star-formation activity in the part where they overlap.

Collected with the Esprit 150 with ASI071 sitting on the Mesu200. On 30th March I managed to get 15 x 10 min, and 1st April gave me 45 x 5 min (I reduced the exposure time as the 10 min exposures blew out the core a bit of M58). Gain was set at 200 (offset 30, -15°C).

This is my last galaxy shot for a while. Now the moon is up and the moon and galaxies do not go well together, as I confirmed with an over-optimistic try last night🥴. Maybe I get a few more chances later in April but after that the sky will be too bright up here.

 

20200401 NGC4568&CoRGB PS21smallSign.jpg

Edited by gorann
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5 hours ago, Rodd said:

Wow--so different than Astrobin--it looks much closer in.  Very nice--like I am looking through a 23rd century telescope.  The palette is subtle, yet strong

Thanks Rodd! Yes, it is sometimes striking how different our images look at different platforms, and different screens. Glad you like it at SGL!

Take care

Göran

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45 minutes ago, HunterHarling said:

Very nice shot!

Same here. Except it's raining here as well:(

Thanks a lot Hunter! Here the sun is in full force and the thermometer reached 15 C for the first time this year, but the moon is of course out in full anti-AP force......

Edited by gorann
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On 05/04/2020 at 09:29, gorann said:

I try to find objects that are not among the most imaged and there are enough galaxies out there.

Yes, but there is a Goldilocks zone: unusual but large enough to show detail. 

Very nice image btw, Göran. 

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3 hours ago, wimvb said:

Yes, but there is a Goldilocks zone: unusual but large enough to show detail. 

Very nice image btw, Göran. 

Yes, but in combination with clouds and moon consipring, I think there are enough of them out there for my Esprit 150 to be busy for a few years, and if it runs out of galaxies, I have 10 times more for my 3.5 m FL SCT.

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