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    • By AstroRuz
      Managed to get an extremely rare clear sky last night, and although I had some rather bizarre equipment issues, I eventually fell back to using my Canon 80D (stock) as the imaging camera. I intended to use no filter but I forgot my IDAS NGS1 was fitted. So yeah, ended up using a filter on a reflection nebula!
       
      75 x 120s, ISO 800, Canon 80D, Sky-Watcher Evostar 80ED, IDAS NGS1, Sky-Watcher EQ6-R Pro, APT, DSS & PS
      This was stacked without bias frames. It was also edited at 4am. So I'm restacking now that I've taken my bias and I'll go again at editing it. Maybe add some more time on it in the future perhaps. Oh, and tone that blue down a hair I think. I can see filter reflections also cus the stars are so bright. I hate that  
      Thoughts?
      Thanks for looking  
       

    • By gorann
      This is 3.5 hours of data with the RASA 8 and ASI2600MC (105 x 2 min at gain 100, -10°C) on a NEQ6. There is apparently quite a bit of dust around M45 that I have not noticed before. I am pleased to see how deep this telescope/camera combination can go in a few hours. A dark site (Bortle 2-3) helps of course. Stacked in PI and mainly processed in PS, as usual.
      EDIT: I now added a second version of the image, inspired by Olly's reprocessing of his data, where I have sharpened the image more (mainly HiPass filtering and LCE in PS), getting closer to the limit of what the data can support.
       


    • By Balage
      Hi guys,
      I am a newbie on this forum, this is my first topic here but I would like to show you my recent planetary imaging results. I started to catch the planets with a dedicated planetary camera last month but never thought that a small 4" Maksutov can show such small details. The equpment I used:
      SW 102/1300 Maksutov 2.25x Q-turret Barlow lens QHY5L-II color camera EQ-3 GOTO mount All the images were taken on differend countrysides in Hungary. I hope you will like it
      Also, please share your images taken with similar OTA, I'd like to learn some tricks from others as well  
       
      Jupiter's 15 minutes of rotation. Captured with Firecapture, processed in AS!3, Registax and WinJUPOS (2020.08.21)
                                                                          
       
      Saturn, 1 hours stacked with AS!3, processed in Registax (2020.09.05)

       
      Mars, 3 hours of rotation. Captured with Firecapture, stacked with AS!3, processed in Registax. (2020.08.22)

       
      Mars again, 5 minutes stacked in AS!3, processed in Registax. You can see also Olympus Mons and Arsia Mons next to the terminator  (2020.09.05)
       
       
      Finally, a result of a Hungarian star party where I learned how to use properly my equipment  This time I borrowed an ADC for Saturn.

       
    • By KevinPSJ
      M45 Pleiades. Captured using Nikon D3200 at prime focus of Skywatcher 150P on EQ3-2 with RA motor tracking (no guiding). Total of 79 x 10s subs at ISO 800 aligned and stacked in DeepSkyStacker to give 7min 20s. Processed in StarTools.
      Thin and high cloud for some of the subs. Taken at 3:30am on Sunday morning Aug 30, 2020.
    • By lenscap
      Sunday 24th May, from 7:30pm BST, 200p F/5, EQ3-2, diy Onstep Goto.
      I've enjoyed watching Venus wane to a thinner & thinner crescent recently, but have never observed Mercury. Having the 2 planets & the Moon only a few degrees apart this week was an opportunity not to be missed. But the gap between the trees & the hill to my West is only about 1 "fist" wide - maybe 40 minutes of observing time. And the late sunset time means Venus would have moved behind the hill before becoming naked-eye visible.
      I don't have a permanent setup & can't see Polaris from my patio so I observe from  a very rough "polar alignment" & have marked the tripod leg positions on the patio so I don't need to Polar, or Star align every session.
      So, having made sure to "Park" the scope at the end of the previous night's session I could just plonk the setup on the marks, "Unpark", "Goto Venus" & lo and behold a tiny crescent Venus appeared about 1 degree from the centre of the  the  9x50 Finder in a sky that was clear of cloud but still pure white from the solar glow !  Isn't Goto wonderful ?
      Venus was such a beautiful thin 4% crescent with "horns" stretching to the meridian. At first it was shimmering  but that must have been a heat plume because a tiny tweak of the focus steadied the image. The seeing was surprisingly good for the low altitude. I enjoyed the view at up to X250 (4mm TMB), before a Goto to Mercury.
      Mercury was not visible in the Finder but was a tiny  dot in the 32mm Plossl. At higher powers I saw it as a 45% crescent. I know it was about 62% illuminated  so the sky must have been too bright for me to see its full extent. I don't claim to have seen any detail - the brightness just reduced steadily from the limb towards the terminator.
      I still couldn't see the Moon naked eye so did another Goto & looked in the Finder. Nothing !  But the bright sky must have been fooling my eye because when I forced myself to focus at infinity it popped in sight. The visible crescent was about half the thickness of a crosshair !  In a 20mm Plossl I could see about 6 medium sized faint, ghostly craters along the limb of a 4% crescent.
      So in about half an hour I had my first sight of Mercury, & seen my thinnest crescents of Venus & Luna. Isn't this hobby fantastic ? 😀
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