Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

Recommended Posts

Each month I get a newsletter from the telescope manufacturer Orion. It contains highlights of objects to observe in the upcoming month including a deep sky challenge. April’s deep sky challenge is:

”This is a great challenge for experienced observers. It's been said that the jet of light, famous in photographs, emanating from the core of M87 can be observed visually in telescopes possibly as small as 10" from a dark sky location, on the clearest of nights.

If you're up for the challenge, try to view M87 as high in the sky as possible, and use as much magnification as the conditions permit. Look for a short streak of light emanating from the core, slightly brighter than the surrounding haze. The key to this challenge is finding the right viewing condition. When trying on different nights, note the visibility of the stellar core — this is a good indicator of the quality of the night and the suitability of a particular eyepiece.

With some patience and a dark, clear night, you may just find Virgo's hidden treasure. Good luck and clear skies!”

Image below from Wikipedia shows the jet of light.

image.thumb.jpeg.a044071a4041e414d86afbf6c8cc6c46.jpeg

Sharing the challenge here for our deep sky observers to take up! Has anyone already completed this challenge? If so what set up did you use and how dark where your skies?

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've observed M87 a few times but I've not seen the jet. To be fair though I've not really looked for it so I'll take that challenge the next time I have my 12 inch dob out :icon_biggrin:

I wonder if any narrowband or line filter would help spot it even if that is at the expense of the galaxy view a bit ?

I usually get distracted by Markarian's Chain when I'm in that part of the sky which might be why I've not studied M87 for too long :rolleyes2:

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Neil I have to admit this is a new one on me. I have just looked at Steve O'Meara - Deep Sky Companion on Messier Objects. He mentions the jet but states you need a large scope in fact he saw the jet in a 20" reflector at a Texas star party.

Well I am up for the challenge anyway

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know whether this will help, but it might ..  an unstretched image of M87 and the jet..  image scale is 1.15"/pp so the jets about 7" in length...  Esprit150

Dave

171777125_M87andJet.jpg.ad429d3b503bdf23a5d9a74505296397.jpg

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Great image @Laurin Dave. Very helpful. Thank you :)

59 minutes ago, John said:

I wonder if any narrowband or line filter would help spot it even if that is at the expense of the galaxy view a bit ?

Good question. Worth an experiment I'd say! 

25 minutes ago, Mark at Beaufort said:

He mentions the jet but states you need a large scope in fact he saw the jet in a 20" reflector at a Texas star party.

The guides on aperture on the newsletter are normally pretty good but do assume good dark skies e.g. 10" to see the Horsehead.

Edited by Littleguy80
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a go last night as transparency was quite good. For about 30 minutes I was nudging the telescope, changing eyepieces,  finding starts at the limit of  my telescope.

But I cannot say I have seem something obvious. 

Perhaps if I had a star chart down to magnitude 15 I would be convinced that I have seem something that was actually there, and not a star at the limit of my telescope popping in and out. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did look at M87 a while back thie evening but not to for too long I'm afraid. I'm wading through the Virgo galaxy field currently and its easy to get distracted and rather lost !

There is some LP in the sky currently so not the best for spotting faint jets perhaps ?

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.