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Hi, my current telescope is Celestron ExploraScope 70AZ, thinking upgrade to skywatcher heritage 130P(came with 25mm ajd 10mm EP) ,  if i do, can i use the eyepiece (4mm) and x3 barlow from my old celestron on the 130P?

One more question, i ordered a eyepiece camera Svbony SV105, i wonder what is magnification of this camera and how it work to change magnification. 

 

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As long as the eyepiece (4mm) and x3 barlow are 1.25" then "yes it will" - but it will be too much magnification with the 4mm e/p' & barlow combined. With the 10mm & barlow combined; it maybe doable. The higher the magnification, you start loose contrast and the finer details of the object you are viewing when focussed, which you is what you do not need. Aperture of the 'scope is king; not the focal length of the eyepiece.  As a guide, 50x per inch/25mm of aperture of the 'scope is normally the sweet-spot.

Not sure about the camera though... sorry! - most budget astro-cameras are equal to what you will see when viewing through the 'scope with your eyes and a 6mm e/p.

Edited by Philip R
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6 hours ago, MrGuGuZai said:

Hi, my current telescope is Celestron ExploraScope 70AZ, thinking upgrade to skywatcher heritage 130P(came with 25mm ajd 10mm EP) ,  if i do, can i use the eyepiece (4mm) and x3 barlow from my old celestron on the 130P?

One more question, i ordered a eyepiece camera Svbony SV105, i wonder what is magnification of this camera and how it work to change magnification. 

 

The term "magnification" doesn't apply to imaging. You can find the field of view of the telescope/camera combination by using this field of view calculator. You will need to find out the dimensions of the sensor and pixel size for your camera because it isn't listed.

The specifications from Amazon

Specification
Sensor:1/3" CMOS OV2710
Pixel size:3μm
Resolution:2 mega pixels 1920x1080

 

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1 hour ago, Cornelius Varley said:

The term "magnification" doesn't apply to imaging. You can find the field of view of the telescope/camera combination by using this field of view calculator. You will need to find out the dimensions of the sensor and pixel size for your camera because it isn't listed.

The specifications from Amazon

Specification
Sensor:1/3" CMOS OV2710
Pixel size:3μm
Resolution:2 mega pixels 1920x1080

 

i just contact the manufacturer, they told me this eyepiece camera is equivalent to 4mm EP

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6 hours ago, Philip R said:

As long as the eyepiece (4mm) and x3 barlow are 1.25" then "yes it will" - but it will be too much magnification with the 4mm e/p' & barlow combined. With the 10mm & barlow combined; it maybe doable. The higher the magnification, you start loose contrast and the finer details of the object you are viewing when focussed, which you is what you do not need. Aperture of the 'scope is king; not the focal length of the eyepiece.  As a guide, 50x per inch/25mm of aperture of the 'scope is normally the sweet-spot.

Not sure about the camera though... sorry! - most budget astro-cameras are equal to what you will see when viewing through the 'scope with your eyes and a 6mm e/p.

 

Stay safe! 😷

i quite worry, because my frend uses a EP from other telescope and the focuser could not focus the object. 

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7 minutes ago, MrGuGuZai said:

i just contact the manufacturer, they told me this eyepiece camera is equivalent to 4mm EP

Below is the results of the field of view calculator. The red rectangle is the field of view of the camera and the yellow circle the same for a 4mm uwa eyepiece. An eyepiece with a narrower field of view will have a smaller circle.

1260324890_astronomy_tools_fov(2).png.d9af5dcd1ac47040ec6ace35f7ea2377.png

 

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