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Hi,
Have you noticed how advanced Gimp has been with the new version 2.10 ?

Now it work perfekt to open Fits 32 bit floating point images and process them. I have tried this many times earlier but it never worked very good. Now it's like a dream to work with.

I'm in the learning process how to use Gimp's capabilities. I have now got the opening process of three grey rgb images to work. It's of course not very complicated, but for me who never used Photoshop or something simular it was and I had hard to find a tutorial for the new version.

I have now made a tutorial for this first step how to start with Gimp and open 32 bits separated color images:
http://www.astrofriend.eu/astronomy/tutorials/tutorial-gimp-astrophotography/01-tutorial-gimp-astrophotography-introduction.html

If you already working with Gimp, have you found something of special interest ?

Lars

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Posted (edited)

I admit it. I tend to be a cheapskate when it comes to software purchases.

GIMP and OpenOffice.org (and/or LibreOffice) are usually the first apps I download on my MS-Windows PC's/laptops. I was 'introduced' to GIMP and OpenOffice.org via Linux distro's (Fedora Core 1 and Mandrake 9.x) many years ago and have not looked back since.

I also have the MacOS X versions of the above apps; plus Stellarium and Celestia (again they are/were all free) on my Apple iBook G4. :icon_salut:

Edited by Philip R

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When there are free tools it's always nice, especially when they work so well.

Today I did a background removal, it was not very difficult, look at page 4 how I did it with the Despeckle Filter in Gimp:

http://www.astrofriend.eu/astronomy/tutorials/tutorial-gimp-astrophotography/01-tutorial-gimp-astrophotography-introduction.html

 

/Lars

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Bookmarked the link, huge thank you.

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On 26/03/2020 at 15:46, Astrofriend said:

Hi,
Have you noticed how advanced Gimp has been with the new version 2.10 ?

Now it work perfekt to open Fits 32 bit floating point images and process them. I have tried this many times earlier but it never worked very good. Now it's like a dream to work with.

I'm in the learning process how to use Gimp's capabilities. I have now got the opening process of three grey rgb images to work. It's of course not very complicated, but for me who never used Photoshop or something simular it was and I had hard to find a tutorial for the new version.

I have now made a tutorial for this first step how to start with Gimp and open 32 bits separated color images:
http://www.astrofriend.eu/astronomy/tutorials/tutorial-gimp-astrophotography/01-tutorial-gimp-astrophotography-introduction.html

If you already working with Gimp, have you found something of special interest ?

Lars

Maybe I'm being a bit dumb, but how do you open OSC fits images in Gimp? when i try i only get greyscale images. 

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7 minutes ago, Astrofriend said:

what is  'OSC'

"One shot colour" -- a colour camera rather than mono (requiring multiple "shots" to get a colour image, obviously).

James

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Ok,

I have three grey images, one for each color, sorry that it was not clear.

It came from a color DSLR camera that I demosaice the CFA image and then get these three grey images from. But that was not done in Gimp, it was done in the preprocess in AstroImageJ. After I have demosaiced the images I handled them as if they were from a mono chrome camera.

Sorry I was unclear.

 

/Lars

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Now I have earned more skills with Gimp. Got the selection around the stars better. I also changed my workflow to get it easier to do.

 

http://www.astrofriend.eu/astronomy/tutorials/tutorial-gimp-astrophotography/01-tutorial-gimp-astrophotography-introduction.html

 

Now I have to subtract the background of the DSO layer and increase the contrast of it. Coming back soon.

 

/Lars

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On 27/03/2020 at 16:51, Astrofriend said:

When there are free tools it's always nice, especially when they work so well.

Today I did a background removal, it was not very difficult, look at page 4 how I did it with the Despeckle Filter in Gimp:

http://www.astrofriend.eu/astronomy/tutorials/tutorial-gimp-astrophotography/01-tutorial-gimp-astrophotography-introduction.html

 

/Lars

Lars I want to thank you for such a generally useful and thorough website. It's great to have the mathematical/physics rigour for many topics.

I can see me spending many cloudy evenings trawling through all of these scholarly endeavours!! 🤓

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Hi Matthew,

Great to herar you find it useful, thanks for the comments !

I have done some small corrections:

http://www.astrofriend.eu/astronomy/tutorials/tutorial-gimp-astrophotography/01-tutorial-gimp-astrophotography-introduction.html

 

With Gimp I can do things that I couldn't do earlier. But earlier I was more concentrated to get high quality calibrated raws. But still my astro photos are taken from high polluted area. Maybe I can get my APO refractor more protable in the future and take it to dark places. My Raspberry project is one part of that.

/Lars

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