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rorymultistorey

What does space look like through binoculars?

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Hi all,

I've made a video about my experience looking through binoculars at deep space objects. I am NOT an observer. So I expect I got a few things wrong. Particularly the fact that it was impossible to film in complete darkness. I'd be really interested to hear whether I was way off the mark or not. And what other deep space objects are good to look at through a small pair of binos. Many thx in advance.

 

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Really nicely made video and I'll be checking out your others. I do most of my observing through a 15x70 bino mounted on a carbon tripod. I think using a tripod or monopod with any size of bino makes a big difference to the detail of what I can see.

Cheers

Martin

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The video reflects my first experience on Friday night, observing under rural skies through 10x50 binoculars. Especially the nebulosity in the Pleiades not seen from home.

So imho you've not over sold binocular use. Nice vid.

 

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1 hour ago, MartinHiggins said:

Really nicely made video and I'll be checking out your others. I do most of my observing through a 15x70 bino mounted on a carbon tripod. I think using a tripod or monopod with any size of bino makes a big difference to the detail of what I can see.

Cheers

Martin

Yeh it was getting a bit wobbly. I'd be really interested in getting some bigger bins with a tripod. Will a camera tripod do? And do you have any recommendations in the 500quid range?

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I use a regular camera/video tripod (pyser-sgi model 520) which can be cranked to a suitable height. That's where the quest comes really, finding one that can actually reach the height needed so you can stand comfortably but is also stable at that setting. I do also have a Slik monopod which can also be used when its more convenient. My bins are 10x50 porro or lighter tho. I'd say if you want to go for the bigger (heavier) bins then you'd be looking at video and the more sturdy models. 

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Good video. I insta clicked it when I saw it go up earlier. A friend and I are going off to find some darker skies tonight seeing as it's going to be super clear tonight for the first time since the 16th I want to make the most of it! I have a pair of Skymaster 15x70's which I am very happy with considering they were just £62. One day I'm hoping to get as a good a shot as you did with Andromeda and those cheap bins and a smartphone :) Cheers!

Edited by BlueStinger
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2 hours ago, rorymultistorey said:

Yeh it was getting a bit wobbly. I'd be really interested in getting some bigger bins with a tripod. Will a camera tripod do? And do you have any recommendations in the 500quid range?

what about these ?

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/tripods/horizon-8115-2-way-heavy-duty-tripod.html

with

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/observation-binoculars/helios-apollo-high-resolution-85mm-binoculars.html

22x85 bins

both are what i use and works well 🍻

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18 minutes ago, Stormbringer said:

Yeh thx for that. I think I have a tripod which would work.  Binos look good too. Why did you go for the x22 rather than the x15s?

Cheers rory

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went for the larger aperture and higher mag as  they fitted in with other bins i have 

also wanted a bit more light grasp over the 70mm

i use them down the foreshore watching the ships going up and down the Forth as well as for astronomy

Awesome binoculars imho 🍻

 

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4 hours ago, rorymultistorey said:

Yeh it was getting a bit wobbly. I'd be really interested in getting some bigger bins with a tripod. Will a camera tripod do? And do you have any recommendations in the 500quid range?

I use a Manfrotto 293C4 tripod and a 128RC head. I bought an additional central pillar and welded a nut onto the bottom which I can screw onto the top of the pillar supplied with the tripod to give a max height of 180cm. My bino is a Helios Lightquest 15x70 so it's a very lightweight set up as I'm usually carrying it all on my bike! If you're getting a heavier binocular you would probably be better served by the suggestions offered above.

Cheers

GOPR1455.JPG

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Looks good. Mafrotto Fluid head nice. I bought the cheaper Neewer version  with a heavy duty fluid head which has broken. The plastic legs were too flimsy. I have a monopod so will absolutely use that with my 7x50  binos. Great idea.

Seems the Helios Binoculars are popular. I'm guessing there is not a huge amount of difference between the lightquest and the apollo versions?

Interesting that you went for 15x version. I believe there is a lower magnification version. I'm starting to think that binos are really best at looking at star clusters and bright objects rather than dim nebula and maybe this is why observers prefer to have the higher magnification models rather than the widefield light bucket versions.

 

Anyways thx for the reply

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It depends on age and your eyes as there's no real point in having an exit pupil of 7mm if your eyes cant dilate over 6mm which is a consideration 

Also the higher mag gives you better contrast (ie darker background ) and things stand out a bit better

The lightquest bins are lighter with possibly better glass and coatings 

Check out Steve Tonkins site Binocular Sky lot of good info there 

http://binocularsky.com/#

Edited by Stormbringer
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Great video indeed. Dartmoor is on my dark sky future short break destination list. I thought the Milky Way had long since vanished 😄 oh no, my mistake, I remember seeing it as a child 43 years ago and not since apart from once in Finland. Excellent video. 

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11 hours ago, rorymultistorey said:

Looks good. Mafrotto Fluid head nice. I bought the cheaper Neewer version  with a heavy duty fluid head which has broken. The plastic legs were too flimsy. I have a monopod so will absolutely use that with my 7x50  binos. Great idea.

Seems the Helios Binoculars are popular. I'm guessing there is not a huge amount of difference between the lightquest and the apollo versions?

Interesting that you went for 15x version. I believe there is a lower magnification version. I'm starting to think that binos are really best at looking at star clusters and bright objects rather than dim nebula and maybe this is why observers prefer to have the higher magnification models rather than the widefield light bucket versions.

 

Anyways thx for the reply

Hi, as mentioned above one difference between the Apollo and the Lightquest is weight. The former weigh 2.5kg for the 15x70 and the latter 1.9kg as it's made from magnesium which is a bonus for me. Yes the Monfrotto fluid head is very nice and smooth. I replaced the quite long handle with a shortish piece of aluminium tube as the bino is light.

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Great video. I always use my binoculars, (7x50's or 20x80's), and camera tripod + joystick head when travelling light or whilst my 'scopes cooling down.

post-4682-0-36306500-1445866821_thumb.jpg  post-4682-0-32308400-1445866920_thumb.jpg

left: 7x50 - right: 20x80

Edited by Philip R
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Before anyone says anything... I don't have a hobby of looking at brickwork with binoculars. (first image).

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