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scarp15

Appreciation Companion Open Clusters

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Posted (edited)

Thwarted by cloud at my dark sky spot in Northumberland, to make the most of the clear spells rather than the promise of clear skies, plans to explore through Hydra to reacquaint with the planetary 'The Ghost of Jupiter' and' The Spindle Galaxy' in Sextans were abandoned.

Instead, parts of Orion, Auriga and Gemini were looking good. Further west Venus and the Pleiades made a good start and finder alignment to the evening. 

Coupled near to M38 in Auriga is NGC 1907, a compact small dense haze, omitted by Messier, but quite easy to regard in fairly small aperture. The complementary nature of the dazzling M38 and its small hazy companion is very pleasing to the eye.

A classic companion open cluster is NGC 2158 associated near to M35 in Gemini. The subtlety of this small faint open cluster near to the quite flamboyant M35 is captivating in contrast. NGC 2158 is nearly five times further in distance than its companion, almost 16,000 light years and it is nearly ten times older. 

Another encounter, this time a more lonesome open cluster in Orion is NGC 2194, subtle, small and hazy.

Prevailing cloud, cold (and falling asleep for a time in the car) I settled for a dazzling view of the Beehive cluster before deciding to quit.

Faint open clusters and companion clusters, they are so bountiful, please share your own favourites and encounters.

 

It was good to be - back out

 

 

 

 

P1090694.JPG

Edited by scarp15
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Auriga has lots of interesting objects but abounds in star clusters based on my fairly limited knowledge. My 15x70 binoculars are a bit of a tease in Auriga, I can pick up good hints but not much resolution, especially trying to hand-hold them. Hoping the older 20/40x100mm obsy bins I'm working on will be ace on star clusters, but will be this summer before I've welded up a fork mount (or give up and buy one, ha).

There is something dazzling about watching a star cluster come into the FOV as you move the scope around, a much grander arrival than chasing faint fuzzies!

I remember my first view of the Beehive Cluster in Jan or Feb last year, it was through 25x100s Celestrons on an AZ4. I was parked up a logging track south of Banchory on the edge of a clearing in the forest, and it was like looking at a handful of diamonds someone had scattered across a black carpet.

Moving around Auriga with whatever scope or bins I can get my hands on is probably my favourite, there's so much in that constellation.

Thanks Iain!

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10 hours ago, Ships and Stars said:

Moving around Auriga with whatever scope or bins I can get my hands on is probably my favourite, there's so much in that constellation.

Spot on!

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On 20/03/2020 at 08:24, Ships and Stars said:

like looking at a handful of diamonds someone had scattered across a black carpet.

Yep, what a sight.  Had the 15x70"s on them a few nights ago. Stunning. 

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