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How can I narrow down what I'm seeing? (Beginner, binoculars)


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Need a bit of help to narrow down what I see, I've wanted to buy a telescope a year ago but a couple of things stopped that decision.

Saw a strong bright glowing star in the cloudless sky so I picked up my old binoculars laying around. I appended three images, one what my phone saw, secondly the raw image, thirdly a star map pointing towards the object (center-ish).

I know it feels pretty laughable for s.o with an 8" GOTO + 5 yrs of experience, but maybe we can attempt to locate the object anyway ;)

 

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IMG_20200312_191702.dng

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Was this star the brightest thing in the sky early on in the evening? I would guess you might have been looking at Venus and that the compass on your phone needs calibrating so the star map is pointing in the wrong direction. 

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Yes it was the brightest thing in the sky in the evening.

In fact, before I looked at this object, I saw a different star in the sky from another room, very bright. When I pointed the map towards it, it displayed Venus and Uranus, so perhaps this was venus but my compass was just broken (highly likely). Thanks this should be closed now.

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