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Basically because you're so undersampled with the camera, it causes the pixels to become very blocky. Drizzling sorts this and smooths the final product. 

If you don't want to drizzle everytime I would use a 2-3x barlow lens to correct the sampling, since the camera uses large pixels

What does the after product look like also?

Edited by matt_baker
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1 minute ago, matt_baker said:

Basically because you're so undersampled with the camera, it causes the pixels to become very blocky. Drizzling sorts this and smooths the final product. 

If you don't want to drizzle everytime I would use a 2-3x barlow lens to correct the sampling, since the camera uses large pixels

What does the after product look like also?

 image.png.c3e9404d46c25e3ed4cf8da2a1615f58.png

I use 2xBarlow for this image.

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2 minutes ago, matt_baker said:

You did? Maybe you need an even larger magnification then to correct the sampling.

Also I meant the after result of the Lunar picture aha but it's okay

Okay, thank you for your help

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