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jamieren

Storing eyepieces out in the cold?

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First, I'm glad to be back. It's been so blumming cold here in western Canada one would die of hypothermia before getting a telescope set up, I haven't wasted any time even thinking about it! lately it's been between -25°C and -35°C. On that note I can't help but wonder about the eyepieces that are sitting out in my unheated garage. The glue used to cement the lenses in, could it be susceptible to that extreme cold? I've wanted to leave it all outside so I don't have to wait 1/2hr for the condensation to clear up before I can use them if it does happen to top -10, but I haven't had that happen yet unless it's accompanied with plenty of cloud cover. Anyone have experience with this issue?

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Surely the point is to keep eyepieces in a warm place, then they don't fog up.

When I'm outside observing ( which isn't very often in the colder months, although it's balmy here in the UK in winter compared to Canada ), I keep eyepieces in plastic containers in an overcoat with a lot of pockets. This keeps the eyepieces nice and warm so that they don't fog up when I take them out.

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I keep mine in the garden shed along with the scope, so they always at ambient temp no matter what. Don't know about the temperature affecting the glue though. (I didn't even know they were glued in....... :( )

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I was always led to believe that keeping them warm and then taking them out in the cold and vice versa was the reason they fogged up and gathered condensation.

I keep all my equipment in a locked up and alarmed garage which is always a couple of degrees warmer than outside temp in the winter and have never had condensation or fogging.

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Surely the point is to keep eyepieces in a warm place, then they don't fog up.

When I'm outside observing ( which isn't very often in the colder months, although it's balmy here in the UK in winter compared to Canada ), I keep eyepieces in plastic containers in an overcoat with a lot of pockets. This keeps the eyepieces nice and warm so that they don't fog up when I take them out.

It cant be very cold when you're out observing otherwise they would "fog up"

Its the change in temperature that makes objects condensate,the moisture in the cold air will condensate on the warmer surface of your eyepiece and the reverse is also true.look at a cold glass of beer you take outside on a warm day,the condensation runs off it.

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Being snug has nothing to do with whether or not you'll get condensation.

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I keep mine in the Maplin flight case - they seem quite snug in the pluck foam.

Same here ! I usually take out my frequent used eyepieces and put them in the accessory tray on my eq5, that way they can stabilise to outside temps for 1 - 2 hours.

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