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osbourne one-nil

Would 10x50 improve in 10x30is binoculars?

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Morning,

I've been taking my Canon 10x30is binoculars with me more and more often on my nightly walks; the only time I get to stretch my legs is normally in the evening.

I love this sort of "observing" because it is purely for visual pleasure, allows me to combine going under the night sky with getting some exercise and most of all opens up some of the lovely observing sites dotted around my village that are inaccessible to telescope observing. I don't want to, therefore, move up to anything like a 70mm or 80mm aperture binocular that would need serious mounting but I would be fine with a monopod etc that would fit easily in a small rucksack. 

Would a pair of 50mm or 60mm binoculars, either handheld or on a monopod, give me any noticeable improvement in viewing experience over my image stabilised binoculars? If it's relevant, I'm in my early late 40s, only wear glasses for reading and live under Bortle 3 skies. 

Thanks!

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I have 7 x 50 and 10 x 50 binoculars and they are both very manageable for hand held observing.

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From what I hear here on SGL,  image stabilised bins are hard to beat. Though they may have a somewhat smaller aperture the IS seems to make all the difference. Folk here on the forum who have a set of canon IS bins generally say they wouldn't go back to non IS. Maybe if you could borrow a set of 10×50's and try a comparison. Anyhow, I have a set of Elinor 10×50 and I they're pretty good and light enough for comfortable hand held viewing. 

 

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Thanks both - I did have a pair of second-hand Canon 15x50is a few years ago but found that when the image stabilisation was activated it introduced a slight blur rendering them pretty unusable for astronomy. In some ways I'm glad I had the chance to try them when I did otherwise I'd be pretty much convinced they were the way to go now. Perhaps I just had a duff pair? Perhaps I've got the best solution already!

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There's probably a local Astronomy club in your approximate area whom you could contact to try out a set of non IS bins. 

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6 hours ago, osbourne one-nil said:

Perhaps I just had a duff pair?

I think you did have.  If you can manage the 15x50's 1180 gram weight while walking (really needs to be ascertained before any final decisons), then that would be a clear upgrade over the 10x30's.  At that weight level there would also be various non IS contenders with higher quality glass, from the lighter Bushnell 10x42 Legend M (750 grams) to the Nikon Monarch 5 16x56 (1230g).  There's also the Steiner 2310 Nighthunter 8x56 (1090g) and currently on offer at £644.

 

Quote

Perhaps I've got the best solution already!

I think you may have tbh.  It's been said on these pages that the 10x30is (when stabilised) is roughly comparable to a budget 10x50 for stargazing, and the 12x36is a  better quality 10x50.  The 12x36 is definitely worth considering, but maybe not worth the extra expenditure or loss on selling the 10x30's.

I personally use a pair of Kowa 6x30 YF's while walking at night, as anything more substantial gets in the way of the exercising for me.  I did try the 10x30is but made me feel nauseous, due to a perceptible slight swimming effect that affects a small percentage of users. 🙂

 

 

Edited by SpaceBass

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Thanks. That all makes sense. As with most things in this hobby, it's all about compromise. The weight certainly doesn't bother me but perhaps spending more for minor benefits...and some some potential drawbacks...just isn't worth it. I just want to make the most of the relatively dark skies I get here on the very rare occasions that they occur. 

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FWIW.......I’d stick with your 10x30 i.s.     I have 10x50 & 7x50 non i.s.    I see more with the 7x because the view is noticeably steadier.   Binos with a monopod is inconvenient for quick looks, perhaps ok for extended viewing.

YMMV.......Ed.

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I have had a pair of Canon 15X50 IS for 20years and they are totally reliable for astronomy and birding. The optics are very good and if they blurr then the stabilising mechanism is definitely faulty. They got me into astronomy and now I have too many telescopes but for a quick look and travel they cant be beat. As with all optics a bit more aperture helps, but more magnification makes finding slightly harder.

Because of the weight I put them on a harness (not neck strap) when walking. Apart from that a good steady support for any binos is a seat and a monopod together (but you cant exactly wander through the night with a chair!)

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Personally, without stabilization, I prefer to come down to 8x for a steadier image and I find 42mm gives a nice compact binocular and a bright, crisp image.

Olly

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I have the Canon 12x36 image-stabilised binoculars.  I find with these I can see more than with 10x50s.  The steadier image more than makes up for the bigger objective.  I suspect the same would apply to your 10x30 IS as well, but can't say for definite as I've never tried them.

I agree with Olly in that I'd rather use my 8x42s than 10x50s, as I can hold them steadier.

Some of the earlier Canon IS binoculars had problems with the stabilisation but the newest versions seem to have solved this completely.

Like others here on Stargazers Lounge and on Cloudy Nights I'd never buy other than image stabilised binoculars again for more or less any hand-held use.

Edited by Second Time Around

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Thanks all...I've absolutely no complaints about my 10x30s at all and I suppose of I was starting from scratch they'd be the pair I went for. Interesting that no one is particularly suggesting I'd gain much from 10x50s and that smaller non stabilised ones might just be comparable to what I already have. At least it saves my money!

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