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To celebrate the 25th anniversary of Sir Patrick's DSO catalogue, I've added the available Caldwells to my basic Marathon search sequence. 

Those interested may be pleasantly surprised by how many of the additional treasures are only a short hop from a given (or en route to the next) Messier.

The sequence for 40°N can be found at the SEDS Messier Marathon homepage or at my blog.

Peace, Stephen

Edited by onefistinthestars
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