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Hi my name is Ash and im from North Wales.    im disabled and i use a wheelchair.    i'm interested in astronomy but i don't want to use a telescope to look up,   i'd like  to have knowledge of what's in our solar system and beyond, stars, constellations, planets, etc.    How do i go about doing this please, what do you suggest,  i'm online alot browsing websites (not astronomy)   Could i follow an astronomy website and learn within an online community,   what do you suggest please?

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Hi Ash,

You could have a look on http://www.worldwidetelescope.org/

To take a tour around not only our solar system, but also many deepsky objects. :)

 

I can also suggest you visit https://www.planetary.org/

There are many great articles and blogs about planetary astronomy in particular, their podcast "Planetary Radio" is also well worth a listen. :)

Edited by jjosefsen
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There is a free one can not rember the name ,  it work be you ask then to take photos of what part of the sky  and there send you a email  of it when done in RGB  so you can do the work in your own time to get the end photo..  I did put a link in on here got to be 4 years ago .

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Hello Ash 🤗,

If you are quick you can sign up for the free futurelearn/Open University 'In the night sky:Orion' course.  It's a 4 week course which started nearly 3 weeks ago.  But it is only 3 hours a week and you can do it at your own pace.  You also keep access for 2 weeks after the end of the course.  The group currently doing it are really friendly (I'm a mentor on it) 

https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/orion/6/todo/63722

Future learn do lots of great courses.

Helen

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We have other members on here who use a wheelchair, hopefully they can give you some advise.

Astronomy is a great hobby for people with disabilities because there are some aspects which can be done like you are suggesting.  If you would like to have a look through a telescope which is really simple, there is this one which can be placed on a table.

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/heritage/skywatcher-heritage-130p-flextube.html

Carole 

 

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1 hour ago, carastro said:

If you would like to have a look through a telescope which is really simple, there is this one which can be placed on a table.

I would have suggested the Heritage virtuoso would be better for a beginner, with no need to fiddle with collimation, smaller too. More expensive maybe, especially if made into a proper goto, but still:

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/heritage/skywatcher-heritage-90-virtuoso.html

There are loads of website though, not least Nasa and Hubble. :smiley:

https://hubblesite.org/images/gallery

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/multimedia/index.html

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Quote

would have suggested the Heritage virtuoso would be better for a beginner, with no need to fiddle with collimation, smaller too. More expensive maybe, especially if made into a proper goto, but still:

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/heritage/skywatcher-heritage-90-virtuoso.html

Yes, even better. Hadn't heard of that one. 

Carole 

Edited by carastro
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With the internet to hand there really is no need to leave the comfort of your own home to developed a deep knowledge of astronomy.

I'm not sure I ever learned anything by looking through my telescopes, other than how to use a telescope!.

SGL is a priceless resource for any learning level and there is an abundance of documentaries and the like on Youtube.

Stellarium on a PC and SkySafari on my mobile devices get used much more than my telescopes and such planetarium packages are increasingly realistic. 

If imaging is something that interests you then an exciting development is underway:

 

Why anyone would want to own and use a telescope in this day and age I'll never know! :):)

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Hi Ash.
While you're learning, you can help professionals with their research by participating in several projects, for instance galaxy classification and exoplanet discovery.

No in depth astronomy knowledge is required, just a computer and spare time.

https://www.zooniverse.org/projects?discipline=astronomy&page=1&status=live

 

 

Edited by ScouseSpaceCadet
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Hi,

Have you come across Astronomy Cast?  Really great series of podcasts - give them a try ;) :

http://www.astronomycast.com/

It's from some of the some folk behind 

https://www.universetoday.com/

who in addition to articles, have a wonderful series of bite size Youtube videos on a wide range of topics.

All the best, 

-Niall 

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