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michael.h.f.wilkinson

Jan 19, 2020: C/2017 T2 (PANSTARRS) spotted once more

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After my first spot of the comet with big binoculars a few days back, I haven't been able to repeat a definite detection, possibly due to some high haze affecting the skies in my suburban back garden. I just had another shot, as the skies were unexpectedly clear around 22:00. I thought I could pick up a bit of fuzziness close to a star, but couldn't be sure. M81 and M82 were visible with my 16x80 bins, but not as bright as usual, so conditions weren't great. I decided to drag out the C8, and have a go. After aligning the finder scope on M42, and admiring that awesome object with the Nagler 31 T5 "Panzerfaust", I swung over to the Double Cluster (which barely fits into the FOV). I did a short star hop from there, and found a patch of fuzz overlaying a little asterism a little way from open cluster NGC 957, as no nebula of sufficient brightness is mapped in this area, this had to be the comet. It also coincided neatly with the position at which I thought I spotted the comet with the Helios 16x80 bins.

 

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I picked up the Comet tonight using my 12" Dob and star hopped via the 80mm Finderscope. Used various EPs - 9mm Myraid 100 degree giving the best view. Wanted to check movement but have had cloud for the past hour.

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Just taken a few snaps of it, I hope 😁

Dave

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I've just managed to find this comet with my 130mm triplet refractor. More or less right overhead currently so not the easiest position for a long refractor to observe but it was worth the contortions to see the small misty patch of light with a brighter centre. Just letting my back and neck muscles recover while I type this ! :rolleyes2:

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2 minutes ago, John said:

I've just managed to find this comet with my 130mm triplet refractor. More or less right overhead currently so not the easiest position for a long refractor to observe but it was worth the contortions to see the small misty patch of light with a brighter centre. Just letting my back and neck muscles recover while I type this ! :rolleyes2:

Hi John.

Nice find! I bet that looks ace. Apologies for the daft question,  are comets around for a long time to view? If so do they move across your fov similar to a planet? I've always assumed that a comet would pass kind of like a shooting star or meteor. 

I feel your pain regarding the funny viewing angles, one of the reasons for the right angle finder purchase was because the straight finder caused all sorts of back pains. Now i have the very helpful rigel to look through the back pains have returned.

 

Regards

Baz.

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Spent,god knows how long,the other night with the 12" dob and just could'nt spot it,i was in the right area but no joy,i have seen it in my c9.25 but had goto,so should really have got it in the dob.Got a pic though....

pans1.jpg

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I had a look with the ST80 between breaks in the cloud, right up by the double cluster tonight but could not see it.

 

andrew

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12 hours ago, andrew63 said:

I had a look with the ST80 between breaks in the cloud, right up by the double cluster tonight but could not see it.

 

andrew

I think it is quite tricky with 80mm aperture. My luck with the 16x80 binoculars (where you have the advantage of TWO 80mm scopes) was a bit patchy. I did spot it once, quite distinctly, but in the rich star fields in Perseus, this object really calls for a bigger scope (and clearer skies).

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