Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_31.thumb.jpg.b7a41d6a0fa4e315f57ea3e240acf140.jpg

Western Mare Serenitatis


Recommended Posts

Dear all,
this morning, before going off to work, I started the day with a lunar sketch of lunar sunset before sunrise at home. I had put the 5" MAK outside over night, so it was properly cooled.
20200116_Western_Mare_Serenitatis_small.thumb.jpg.ae2012b8ee8ac2601b693e704bcabdb4.jpg
 

Telescope: Celestron NexStar 127 SLT

Eyepiece: Explore Scientific 6.7mm/82°

Date & Time: January 16th, 2020 / 0715-0745 CET

Location: Home terrace, Dusseldorf Region, Germany

Technique: Koh-i-Noor chalk, extra charcoal and whitecoal pens and pieces on Seawhite of Brighton black sketching paper

Size: appr. 20x30cm

 

Clear skies!

Achim

  • Like 10
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By acr_astro
      Dear all,
      yesterday afternoon, the forecasts for the evening were good so I set up the 10" truss-tube Dobsonian on the terrace for cooling down. Actually in the evening the sky wasn't as clear as expected but the cirrostratus luckily did not harm too much. It could have been brighter but anyway ...
      So I tried my new 2x focal extender with the 10 inch scope for the first time and magnified up to 370x. Seeing was okay and I really enjoyed travelling along the terminator from Plato via Copernicus down to Clavius. For the 10"er the focal extender is really an enhancement when viewing the moon and conditions are okay: I saw much more detail in Clavius as I have ever observed before. 
      This would have been a good sketching target but finally I decided to go for a sketch of the magificient Copernicus (named after the famous Polish astronomer by Giovanni Riccioli mid of the 17th century): 
      The crater floor was still completely in darkness, one could only see the bright, round rim of this 93km wide crater. The terraced slopes were just partly in the lunar sunrise yet. Obviously the central peaks are as expected lower than the rim - they were still hidden in the darkness. The two craters north of it are Gay-Lussac A and Gay-Lussac on the way to the Montes Carpates with their eastern parts already visible.
      Here's the sketch:

      Telescope: Martini 10" f/5 truss-tube Dobsonian
      Eyepiece: Explore Scientific 6.7mm/82° with Explore Scientific 2x focal extender
      Date & Time: Jan 22nd, 2021 / 1900-2000 CET
      Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany
      Technique: Koh-i-Noor charcoal, whitecoal and chalk blocks and pens on black sketching paper
      Size: 11"x11"
      Clear skies!
      Achim
    • By acr_astro
      Dear all,
      today after work I enjoyed the sunny afternoon on our terrace with the Lunt H alpha telescope. Here's the sketch with natural charcoal of our pretty calm home star.

      Telescope: Lunt LS 50 THa B600 PT
      Eyepiece: Celestron X-cel 10mm
      Date & Time: April 6th, 1530-1615 CEST
      Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany
      Technique: natural vine charcoal on white Hahnemühle Ingres mould-made pastel paper
      Size: 24x31cm 
      Clear and sunny skies!
      Achim
    • By acr_astro
      Dear all,
      yesterday evening I have chosen the lunar crater J. Herschel (named after British astronomer John Herschel from 19th century, the son of William Herschel) which exposed a pretty convexed floor in the rising sun. The crater has a diameter of about 150 km and lies at the northern "coast" of Mare Frigoris.
      The sketch starts with Harpalus in the South, then you can see the 24 km crater Horrebow (named after a Danish astronomer from 17th century) just at the southern rim of J. Herschel. At the northern end of my sketch we have the 71 km crater Philolaus.
      The dominating crater J. Herschel (too be precisely a walled plain) has a quite rough surface which is said to be caused by ejecta from the impact that formed the Mare Imbrium. This rough structure and its convexed shape resulted in a nice three-dimensional appearance.
      Southeast of it, I sketched the secondary craters J. Herschel F and la Condamine B which are located in Mare Frigoris.
      So here's the sketch:

      Telescope: Celestron NexStar 127 SLT
      Eyepiece: Explore Scientific 14mm/82° (due to the poor seeing, I couldn't go for the 6.7mm/82°)
      Date & Time: January 6th, 2020 / 1845-1945 CET
      Location: Backyard, Dusseldorf Region, Germany
      Technique: Koh-i-Noor chalk, extra charcoal and whitecoal pens and pieces on Seawhite of Brighton black sketching paper
      Size: appr. 20x30cm
      And finally here's a photo of my observation place:

      Clear skies!
      Achim
    • By acr_astro
      Dear all,
      today once again, I did a charcoal sketch of our star bringing us 33°C before lunch time. The solar "north pole" is approximately at the prominence at the top of the sketch. The sketch is right-left flipped. Beside the orientation of the north pole, I figured out on the internet that the bright spot in the left area of the sketch is AR12745. The disc and parts of the prominences is done with natural charcoal. The filament and the dark areas of the prominences are done with the charcoal pen.

      Telescope: Lunt LS 50 THa B600 PT
      Eyepiece: Celestron X-cel 10mm
      Date & Time: July 23rd, 2019 / 1130-1200 CEST
      Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany
      Technique: natural vine charcoal and Koh-i-Nor charcoal pen on white Hahnemühle Ingres mould-made pastel paper
      Size: 24x31cm
      Clear (and sunny) skies!
      Achim
    • By acr_astro
      Dear all,
      as usual, I couldn't resist to create yet another charcoal sketch of the H alpha sun. It is relaxing for me to observe the proms and filaments and to try to catch them "as they are" on the paper. At first glance, the sun looks pretty similar - just at second glance and comparison with my other sketches, I have seen that it looks similar but always a bit different. The disc and the prominences are done with natural charcoal, just for the filaments, I needed a Koh-i-Noor artificial charcoal pen since it's darker.

      Telescope: Lunt LS 50 THa B600 PT
      Eyepiece: Celestron X-cel 10mm
      Date & Time: July 1st, 2019 / 1015-1045 CEST
      Location: home terrace, Dusseldorf region, Germany
      Technique: natural vine charcoal and Koh-i-Nor charcoal pen on white Hahnemühle Ingres mould-made pastel paper
      Size: 24x31cm
      Clear (and sunny) skies!
      Achim
       
       
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.