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Hello


Mancunian Lee
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Hi

Im Lee from Manchester (if my name didnt give it away!!) ive been reading up on Astronomy for as long as i can remember, but its now that im older and wiser ive decided to look into the hobby a little more and purchase my first telescope and enjoy things on another level.

Anyone here from the same area? being close to the city im finding it hard to work out where i can go with a telescope, but ill worry about that after purchase :lol:

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Welcome Lee,

Nothing but a good bunch on here.

I'm sure some of the Northern Posse will be over soon!! I think there's quite a few members around you.

Have you got your scope yet or are you still looking, either way we're here to help.

Look forward to your posts.

Greg

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welcome to the Forum Lee sit back and enjoy the ride now you have joined one of lifes great rollercoasters the ups of seeing fantastic new things and the downs of looking at clouds :lol:

just fire away with your questions you will get the very best of help on this top forum :sunny:

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I live in Ashton Under Lyne, pretty close to Stockport :lol:

Welcome Lee. I hope you find this forum helpful. 8)

I have a question, though and pardon my off topic-ness. I see descriptions of locations in England like the above from time to time, and I wonder exactly what causes somewhere to be "under" somewhere else? Being from the States, we don't use this convention. ??

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I live in Ashton Under Lyne, pretty close to Stockport :lol:

Welcome Lee. I hope you find this forum helpful. 8)

I have a question, though and pardon my off topic-ness. I see descriptions of locations in England like the above from time to time, and I wonder exactly what causes somewhere to be "under" somewhere else? Being from the States, we don't use this convention. ??

Im from Newcastle-under-Lyme which is next to Stoke-on-Trent! Lots of odd names around here.

from a quick google i found this :

"Lyme Park and Ashton-Under-Lyne are close to Manchester, but Newcastle-Under-Lyme, Audlem and Burslem are further south, so what's the connection? Lyme means elm tree and by association 'forest', here the forest of Lancashire, so Ashton-Under-Lyne is a translation of Latin 'infra limam' - 'under the lyme' or inside the forest or boundary of Lancashire. The place names further south also refer to Lyme but the connection is less clear. Another interpretation doesn't mention the 'boundary' connection, saying Lyme means simply 'of or near the elm trees'."

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Hi, the name comes from "Ash trees under" thats Ashton Under and the Lyne part comes from Limeside and Limehurst which are two areas to the north taking there name from being in areas covered in lyme trees

So it basically describes where the place was during the norman conquest in 1066 - there was a small settlement of people here and no town name so it was just described as the Ash trees under Lime meaning the two areas above.

Over time it has changed into Ashton Under Lyne as most English place names do. The next time over is Dukinfield (pronounced duck-in-field) Duck is the Saxon word for the Danish, the Saxons defeated the Danes there and the area was described as Duck In Field meaning its where the Danes were killed and there bodies were buried.

A lot of british names come from descriptive words, including peoples names. Taylor, Butcher, Bowyer are all descriptive of their occupation. Then there are surnames which show us where a person is from or there descendants, my surname is Storey and that means "Son Of Storr" so at some point in history someone was known as John the son of storr and it gradually fades into Storey somehow.

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I live in Ashton Under Lyne, pretty close to Stockport :)

Welcome Lee. I hope you find this forum helpful. 8)

I have a question, though and pardon my off topic-ness. I see descriptions of locations in England like the above from time to time, and I wonder exactly what causes somewhere to be "under" somewhere else? Being from the States, we don't use this convention. ??

Im from Newcastle-under-Lyme which is next to Stoke-on-Trent! Lots of odd names around here.

from a quick google i found this :

"Lyme Park and Ashton-Under-Lyne are close to Manchester, but Newcastle-Under-Lyme, Audlem and Burslem are further south, so what's the connection? Lyme means elm tree and by association 'forest', here the forest of Lancashire, so Ashton-Under-Lyne is a translation of Latin 'infra limam' - 'under the lyme' or inside the forest or boundary of Lancashire. The place names further south also refer to Lyme but the connection is less clear. Another interpretation doesn't mention the 'boundary' connection, saying Lyme means simply 'of or near the elm trees'."

Great find and said it better than myself :lol:

On-trent means its on the river trent doesnt it? like Newcastle upon tyne, being on the river tyne?

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Thanks guys. I think I got it now, more or less. To think that place names have held up since 1066 just makes my head hurt. :insects1: :lol:

hehe, i have furniture older than america! But i agree, when names have been handed down since roman times, it makes our everyday stuggles seem irrelevant

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