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acr_astro

Lunar crater J. Herschel at northern border of Mare Frigoris

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Posted (edited)

Dear all,

yesterday evening I have chosen the lunar crater J. Herschel (named after British astronomer John Herschel from 19th century, the son of William Herschel) which exposed a pretty convexed floor in the rising sun. The crater has a diameter of about 150 km and lies at the northern "coast" of Mare Frigoris.
The sketch starts with Harpalus in the South, then you can see the 24 km crater Horrebow (named after a Danish astronomer from 17th century) just at the southern rim of J. Herschel. At the northern end of my sketch we have the 71 km crater Philolaus.
The dominating crater J. Herschel (too be precisely a walled plain) has a quite rough surface which is said to be caused by ejecta from the impact that formed the Mare Imbrium. This rough structure and its convexed shape resulted in a nice three-dimensional appearance.
Southeast of it, I sketched the secondary craters J. Herschel F and la Condamine B which are located in Mare Frigoris.

So here's the sketch:

20200106_J_Herschel_small.JPG.19e4a0ca5f7b44a9019ca596979b8e76.JPG

Telescope: Celestron NexStar 127 SLT
Eyepiece: Explore Scientific 14mm/82° (due to the poor seeing, I couldn't go for the 6.7mm/82°)
Date & Time: January 6th, 2020 / 1845-1945 CET
Location: Backyard, Dusseldorf Region, Germany
Technique: Koh-i-Noor chalk, extra charcoal and whitecoal pens and pieces on Seawhite of Brighton black sketching paper
Size: appr. 20x30cm

And finally here's a photo of my observation place:

20200106_192920.jpg.bf0525b3ec75f6130e42bd7615844257.jpg

Clear skies!

Achim

Edited by acr_astro
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Another excellent sketch. I keep trying out the charcoal/chalk technique but it just does not work for me. Your sketch has a definite 3D feel to it - enhanced I think by doing a narrow strip of black, rather than doing a wide strip - I shall try this idea out. Very interesting area of the moon which I have yet to venture to with any serious sketch in mind.

Thanks for posting.

Mike

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