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timwetherell

Dimming of Betelgeuse animation

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Ahh, to lose the long term pleasure of a symmetrical Orion for the fleeting thrill of a supernova blast. 

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5 hours ago, Dave Lloyd said:

Ahh, to lose the long term pleasure of a symmetrical Orion for the fleeting thrill of a supernova blast. 

Yes definitely a bitter sweet moment Dave.

Jim 

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Posted (edited)

Spotted Beetlejuice the other night, naked eye. It's very dim compared to any other time I've seen it in 40 years.

I've been reading a lot lately about it and many people think we are witnessing the death of it. If so, it's already happened, and given the speed of light we will see changes over the next few months/years.

One show I saw on TV said that when Betelguese does go SN, the resulting SN or Nebula will completely fill the sky. We wont be able to see anything else.

Edited by LukeSkywatcher
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On 08/01/2020 at 19:02, LukeSkywatcher said:

One show I saw on TV said that when Betelguese does go SN, the resulting SN or Nebula will completely fill the sky. We wont be able to see anything else.

I imagine if it does go supernova during the initial few weeks it will be like having a permanent full moon so no one will get much of a view of faint fuzzies in that area of the sky! But I think the resulting planetary nebula will be relatively small and fairly dim? There's a bit of discussion about it's size up further up this thread :)

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Brilliant animation, Tim. I was thinking about going through my old photos of Orion and comparing them to now to see the difference. 

Regards,

Reggie :) 

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Really emphasizes the difference in magnitude, nice work.

 

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Nice demonstration of what we are all talking about.
It really is dimmed to the eye now against last year.

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