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Kronberger 63


Petergoodhew
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Kronberger 63 is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Orion . It was discovered by Austrian Mattias Kronberger who is a member of the amateur group Deep Sky Hunters.
It is very faint and thus rarely imaged. Indeed my searches have found only one other image, produced by the Chart32 team in Chile.

Astrodon Blue: 21x300"
Astrodon Green: 20x300"
Astrodon Red: 20x300"
Astrodon OIII: 48x1800s bin 2x2
Astrodon Ha: 26x1800s bin 2x2

Total Integration: 42 hours

Captured on my dual rig in Spain.
Scopes: APM TMB LZOS 152 (6" aperture 1200mm focal length)
Cameras: QSI6120wsg8
Mount: 10Micron GM2000 HPS

Kn63 v2.jpg

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23 minutes ago, ampleamp said:

Do you have any single sub 30 minute 2x2 frames to view as I would like to see where you started from on this. 

Here you go Alistair - a typical unprocessed OIII 30 minute Bin 2x2 sub. The Ha is much much fainter.

Peter

S1_Kn63_OIII_1800sec_2x2_frame12.jpg

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Great pic! I really like how you hunt down all these faint nebulae. You put in a lot of hours, but the results are clearly showing and bring something off the beaten track. Exactly what I would (try to) do if I had a remote observatory! 

Regards, 

Pieter 

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