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Neil H

Is my telescope any good

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In terms of visual reference, I tend to avoid images and focus instead on sketches from seasoned observers. Using them as a guide and understanding them as the best representation I'm likely to see myself.  

The linked video of Saturn probably presents a run of stacked images passed through some kind of software to tidy the image. With a power of 300x and an exit pupil of around 0.3mm it is not a handy guide for visual work.

Nevertheless, on any reasonable night of seeing my 4" Vixen offered more visual information of Saturn this late summer than the video. However, no matter how much I worked with my Mak 127, I cannot remember ever seeing the Cassini Division. My Tal 100 achro would struggle and only on the best of best nights does the little TV76 reveal a hair line gap. Taking this into account, when observing planets with smaller apertures not only do the atmospheric conditions, one's experience and visual acuity play a significant role, but so to the quality of optics used.  

Finally, reading charitably the video and many sketches, I feel that astronomy is a very intellectual hobby. Many of the things we look at are barely visible or are whispering hints of something more just beyond our immediate grasp. Most people think we're nutcases. Sitting out in the cold and dark, observing barely nothing. I also think a lot of people find astronomy disturbing and even frightening. They either don't get it or simply don't want to. The reason we get exited about it and may exaggerate our visual experience is because we know what it is that we're looking at and it is that very knowledge which fuels our kick.

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well I did go on his channel and see other videos

he has only 3 videos of planets. the other video juipter it shows again same scope and says 3mm ep not sure its a typo but it does say same scope as the sauturn one. But every other video (99%) is of fire works not astronomy.

in any case neil it doesn't matter you have that scope and its not a trash scope (its a good starter scope) its just the finder and ep that are not the best after that we are sure you can have lots fun with it

joejaguar

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Ok guys thank you I am enjoying this new hobby got bitten by the bug the other night with the moon , spotted scope change and working better , eyepieces should be here soon , started saving for a 150 or 200 skywatcher telescope , so thing can only get better 

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The good thing you can do is to learn your way around a scope thoroughly with the 114mm, learn observing techniques and push its capability as far as you can. With that experience under your belt, when you do upgrade you will "hit the ground running" with your skills and experience and get a lot more from the upgrade :icon_biggrin:

 

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With regard to the Saturn video, i've actually seen Saturn looking almost exactly like that, and even a little bit better in moments of really good seeing towards the back end of September.

I was thrilled at the time, because Saturn is right at its lowest point in the sky for us northerners (i'm at 53ºN) and it can only improve over the coming years.

All about getting decent seeing. And being patient. I've only had that night and another about three quarters as good in the 6 or 7 times i've observed it since i had my scope before it got too low.

Using a binoviewer helps, because you can observe in total comfort, relax, and follow the planet and play a waiting game, hoping for a few moments of steady air to come along.

I was using a 2.6x compensator and 13mm Naglers giving a little under 200x which i think is a sweetspot for Saturn.

It will be a good 5 or 6 months again before i can see it again and in 2020 Mars will join the party too.

 

 

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If you compare the altitude of Saturn for us vs the Philippines, for us it was at around 16.7 degrees for the last opposition, for them it was at over 53 degrees

That makes a huge difference to what can be seen. I recall when I first started out in the hobby, Saturn was up at 56 degrees and the views were much better than we get currently. I even recall seeing the Enke Division (or Minima?) In my 150mm Newt which wasn't the most stunning optically. The relatibe lack of atmosphere makes a huge difference.

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