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Chris49

iOptron Mount Zero Position

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I have recently bought an iOptron GEM45 (from FLO) and I am a bit mystified by the Zero Position.  The hand control gives you the options of "Goto Zero Position" and also "Search Zero Position", but they appear to do the same thing!

Does the mount have sensors like the Home position of a Paramount, which sets the axes to an exact hardware position, or is it something else?

I guess this is the same for other iOptron EQ mounts so maybe a skilled user can enligten me.

Many thanks

Chris

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Never hurts to read the Instruction Manual...........

Section 5.10 says:

5.10.1. Goto Zero Position

This moves your telescope to its Zero Position.

5.10.2. Set Zero Position

This set the Zero Position for the firmware. The Zero Position reference will be an undefined value after firmware upgrade, or it may lost during power outage or HC battery replacement. You can use this function to set the zero position reference. Press the ENTER after moving the mount to Zero Position either manually or with the hand controller.

5.10.3. Search Zero Position

In the event of power failure, the mount will lose all its alignment information. This can be very troublesome if the mount is being operated from a remote observation site and is controlled via the internet. To counter this, the GEM45 has been equipped with a function that can find the Zero Position for an initial mount set up. Select “Search Zero Pos.” and the mount will start to slew slowly and find the R.A. and DEC position to set the mount to the Zero Position. When the mount has found the Zero Position, the HC will ask if you want to calibrate the Zero Position. Press ENTER to confirm. Use the arrow button to adjust the mount in RA and DEC to correct the obvious discrepancy in the Zero Position. Alternatively, press BACK to cancel.

Michael

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With my old iEQ45 I just scroll down to zero position press enter and it wanders off to some arbitrary point I then loosen the clutches and set it to up / north so it knows where it's at, as said the latest software helps to find the place for you.

Dave

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11 hours ago, michael8554 said:

Never hurts to read the Instruction Manual...........

 

I had read it, but sadly I hadn't understood it - hence the request for guidance.

My anxiety was that you could tangle up the through-the-mount cabling by moving the Zero Position.

The Goto Zero Position takes you to where the mount thinks is Up and North, but not if the clutches have moved.  The Search Zero command (by some clever method that I do not understand) sets the mount to Up and North even if the clutches have moved.  But doesn't this mean that the wiring risks getting wound up?  Apparently not.

I think I now know what to do but without understanding why.

Chris

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12 hours ago, Davey-T said:

With my old iEQ45 I just scroll down to zero position press enter and it wanders off to some arbitrary point I then loosen the clutches and set it to up / north so it knows where it's at, as said the latest software helps to find the place for you.

Dave

I don't know if iEQ45 has through-the-mount cabling, but I will try your approach and see how i get on.

Thanks

Chris

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Mine hasn't got through the mount cabling, I have put a couple of marks to indicate zero position, I believe later ones came with two self adhesive arrows to stick on don't know if newer ones have this, I also rotated mine through ninety degrees to fit side by side dual scopes which meant altering the zero position but this didn't affect the operation.

Dave

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I don't have this mount but those descriptions in the Manual say:

Goto Zero Position - Mount goes to the stored Zero Position

Set  Zero Position - if the mount goes to an incorrect Position because it's lost the setting for the stated reasons, you can carefully return the mount to the correct position and Set that as the Zero Position. 

Search Zero Position - if you are unable to be physically present to return the mount to the correct Zero Position as above, this will search for and return the mount to the correct position. 

Michael 

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50 minutes ago, michael8554 said:

Search Zero Position - if you are unable to be physically present to return the mount to the correct Zero Position as above, this will search for and return the mount to the correct position. 

Michael 

I found a thread on cloudy nights https://www.cloudynights.com/topic/513870-cem60-search-for-zero-and-other-stuff/ in which someone took his CEM60 apart and found a combination of pins and Hall Effect sensors that control the Search Zero process.  Presumably that is more accurate for setting the zero than doing it by adjusting the clutches by hand and eye, whether you can be present or not.

Thank you for your efforts to help.

Chris

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With my iEQ45 Pro when telling it to go to zero I loosened both clutches, let the mount do it's thing then set the clutches with weights down scope pointing north...

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