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northwalesparry

Is it too cold ?

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8 minutes ago, Rob Sellent said:

 

On the other hand, I don't mind the heat and only begin to suffer when temperatures outdoors pick up to around +50ºc.

 

I find 30c way too hot!

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It was too cold for me last night. When the locks freeze up on the car it's a no, no.

 

Glen.

 

 

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In the old days of film  SLR  cameras,  you had to be really careful winding them on at  -30'C or below as the emulsion would crack  as it tried to wrap itself around the spindle.

When you developed the film you could tell immediately it was a bad day as the tell tale vertical stripes appeared.

Olympus OM-1's were good in terms of batteries, as they only used electricity for metering.   The OM-2SP (electronic shutter ) was a nightmare and chewed batteries by the dozen.

Edited by Craney

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Last December for the meteor shower, it was nice to bundle up in a sleeping bag for the light show.

I just wish my gravity lounge chair was a double so the missus could have been a bit closer for the extra warmth.😊

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When I've cycled in very cold conditions (down to around -5C) it's usually around the two hour mark that's my limit, despite wearing many layers and keeping moving.  The simple action of breathing ends up being a big drain on heat and warm moisture from my lungs, the same probably applies in astronomy although I'd expect the breathing rate to be much less.

Probably the ideal temperature for visual observing will be around 5- 10C for me, comfortable enough to stay out well wrapped up and mild enough that the dew heaters can do their job, but when those clear skies beckon it's so tempting to set up even if I spend the same amount of time observing as I do setting up / taking down!

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19 minutes ago, jonathan said:

When I've cycled in very cold conditions (down to around -5C) it's usually around the two hour mark that's my limit, despite wearing many layers and keeping moving.  The simple action of breathing ends up being a big drain on heat and warm moisture from my lungs, the same probably applies in astronomy although I'd expect the breathing rate to be much less.

I've cycled at down to -15C and that was before I discovered suitable clothing. It was agony on the hands and feet!
Years later I discovered MTB winter boots and GripGrab two fingered mitts. Both will keep you cosy.
You must have a windproof shell [not waterproof] to make any sense of layering.
I have several windproof jackets all bought from charity shops. A bit dated but excellent wind stops.
The Danes discard a load of cycling stuff and there are a lots of keen cyclists.
I only use the jackets around specific temperature ranges to avoid overheating.

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4 minutes ago, Rusted said:

I've cycled at down to -15C and that was before I discovered suitable clothing. It was agony on the hands and feet!
Years later I discovered MTB winter boots and GripGrab two fingered mitts. Both will keep you cosy.
You must have a windproof shell [not waterproof] to make any sense of layering.
I have several windproof jackets all bought from charity shops. A bit dated but excellent wind stops.
The Danes discard a load of cycling stuff and there are a lots of keen cyclists.
I only use the jackets around specific temperature ranges to avoid overheating.

Absolutely, I've only worn my waterproof when the coldest and strongest winds are blowing, it's literally too cold to sweat on those days so the waterproof makes sense (windproofs have their limit, no matter how expensive they are).  I've only done that maybe two or three times, once was when the temperature was literally -5 when I set off, probably got colder up on the high forest plateau, that place was frozen solid with several inches of snow (the bike stood up in it without aid), and because the going was so difficult it wasn't possible to get warmed up, just keeping stopping and putting feet in deep frozen snow sapped the warmth away even through thick shoes.

I wouldn't attempt to get a scope out in conditions like that, but if clear then it might be fun to go out with just the mk 1 eyeball or binoculars for 30 minutes or so.

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All I know is my scopes will cope with much colder conditions than me!

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It is too cold, or maybe my tolerance for the cold has got less as I have got older. Certainly I used to go night fishing when the temperature would be -10, or worse, seemed to cope fine, but of course that was 30+ years ago!

Tonight though is super clear as was forecast, so I had to have a little look, didn't I? I have done my back in again a little bit and didn't plan ahead anyway, so did not have any big optics handy, so thought I would just go out for 40 minutes or so, with my eyeballs and my little ED monocular. I only had four layers on, with a hat and thin inner gloves, so only expected to last a short while, which turned out to be the case. My fingers are still slightly numb! But my little 8x42 monocular got me a glimpse of M42 and the Pleiades, so me is happy. :smiley: ( My super light tripod helps here too. )

But it is cold out there, not sure how cold, but too cold for my fingers, with the thin gloves on. So what do you people do to keep fingers warm, but still fairly dexterous? I can easily keep them warm, just multiple layers of good gloves, but then of course I lose all dexterity, don't want to risk dropping an eyepiece. Is there a solution?

Still a good little session though, the views tonight sort of reminded me of back 40+ years ago, looking through my first scope a cheap 50mm one, which I still have by the way! One good thing about the cold, it makes you appreciate the warmth of the house!

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10 hours ago, Greymouser said:

 

But it is cold out there, not sure how cold, but too cold for my fingers, with the thin gloves on. So what do you people do to keep fingers warm, but still fairly dexterous? I can easily keep them warm, just multiple layers of good gloves, but then of course I lose all dexterity, don't want to risk dropping an eyepiece. Is there a solution?

 

I have suffered with poor circulation in my fingers for years and the only thing that works for me is USB heated hand warmers which keep my hands warm by alternating one hand for adjusting and the other in my pocket with the hand warmer. If you can find a pair of gloves that you can use for adjustments then it does help but I don’t normally need any.

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12 hours ago, Greymouser said:

It is too cold, or maybe my tolerance for the cold has got less as I have got older. Certainly I used to go night fishing when the temperature would be -10, or worse, seemed to cope fine, but of course that was 30+ years ago!

Tonight though is super clear as was forecast, so I had to have a little look, didn't I? I have done my back in again a little bit and didn't plan ahead anyway, so did not have any big optics handy, so thought I would just go out for 40 minutes or so, with my eyeballs and my little ED monocular. I only had four layers on, with a hat and thin inner gloves, so only expected to last a short while, which turned out to be the case. My fingers are still slightly numb! But my little 8x42 monocular got me a glimpse of M42 and the Pleiades, so me is happy. :smiley: ( My super light tripod helps here too. )

But it is cold out there, not sure how cold, but too cold for my fingers, with the thin gloves on. So what do you people do to keep fingers warm, but still fairly dexterous? I can easily keep them warm, just multiple layers of good gloves, but then of course I lose all dexterity, don't want to risk dropping an eyepiece. Is there a solution?

Still a good little session though, the views tonight sort of reminded me of back 40+ years ago, looking through my first scope a cheap 50mm one, which I still have by the way! One good thing about the cold, it makes you appreciate the warmth of the house!

I wear a pair of thin silk glove liners for dexterous moves, 
Over these I wear a thick thinsulate pair of fingerless gloves.
If it get very cold the fingerless ones swap for a pair with an over mitten bit on the finger tips.

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I was out on Friday nite for a session. 
Gear was working nicely but fogging up became an issue. Crept up on me from behind. Never had it so bad in my kit. RDF and finderscope useless.  Eyepieces we’re following suit. 
Happy I made the effort but ended up baling out once SWMBO offered a brew / mince pie, via a text and my feet were asking to be warm 

John 

 

Edited by Telescope40

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12 hours ago, banjaxed said:

the only thing that works for me is USB heated hand warmers

I didn't even know such a thing existed. I had considered digging out the old fashioned ones ( that you light the charcoal for? ) that I have lying about somewhere, but otherwise would do as Alan does in future. Perhaps a combination approach is needed.

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Not sure if you are asking with regards to the scope or personally.

Personally, I have no problem with cold/very cold. I sleep with my window open all year round and will take -5 over 25 in the city any day. 

-2 is a walk in the park for me. As long as I have my woolly hat on. 😁

As far as the scope is concerned, I can't imagine the cold will make any difference. But what the hell do I know.

 

Cheers

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On 01/12/2019 at 22:54, Greymouser said:

I didn't even know such a thing existed. I had considered digging out the old fashioned ones ( that you light the charcoal for? ) that I have lying about somewhere, but otherwise would do as Alan does in future. Perhaps a combination approach is needed.

I spent an hour outside last night without gloves and just a hand warmer in each pocket and I was fine, and this is someone who’s fingers go white in a few minutes in the cold. I  have tried every form of gloves and hand warmers but these USB hand heaters are the only ones that really work for a long period.

Edited by banjaxed
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Minus 5 last night, remote location, 12 inch scope, army softie suit, lots of layers, hot flask, stunning clear skies = bliss.  :) I don't care how cold it is, as long as I am well away from man-made light pollution!

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