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northwalesparry

Is it too cold ?

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Too cold for me, never mind the scope.  Solar from now on until next Spring.   😀

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I know a guy on another forum who images in -20 or more in Minnesota, no idea how he can cope with it though.

Carole 

Edited by carastro

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I used to work in Muskoka, Ontario where it got down to -20 deg c in winter!!!

I still have a small scar on my eyelid where the skin froze to the eyepiece!!

(The grease also froze in my tracking mount....)

Things are a bit easier here in Oz, but observing at +30 deg c at night (!!!) has it's issues.

 

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I've had ice (as opposed to a bit of frost) form on the OTA before now, though I've no idea how cold it was at the time.

The real problem is the lack of physical activity I reckon.  I've skiied at -14C and it was no bother at all.

James

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If you”re doing something active a few degrees below zero is nothing but just standing around not so pleasant. 

Coldest I’ve ever experienced was -40 and with windchill felt like -70. Redefines what you think of as being cold. 🙀

 

Edited by johninderby
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I'm still imaging just outside Horncastle, it is -3C according to the temp sensor.

Can never be too cold to image...camera, lens and mount is covered in frost, going to be a pain taking it indoors soon.

I'm alternating between being outside and being indoors next to the fire.

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Just given up imaging for tonight as it's -6c and the dew band couldn't cope.  The central area of the lens was fogged up and wouldn't stay clear even with the help of my mini hair dryer.  I was snug in the warm room at 20c so I didn't feel the cold at all.  🤣

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3 hours ago, johninderby said:

Coldest I’ve ever experienced was -40 and with windchill felt like -70. Redefines what you think of as being cold.

A close friend of mine who happens to be a British Antarctic Service veteran , maintained (admittedly tongue in cheek) it was so cold at Halley Bay one winter that when one of the sledge dogs had a pee it had to be "kicked over" to break the "icicle" to stop it being glued to the ice shelf🤣

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I have deliberately sat at the telescope at -23-25C showing on two digital thermometers.
My collection of old down jackets can be layered if need be.
Here I am well wrapped up.

An utterly pointless exercise but I wanted to see if it was possible.
The eyepieces fogged up in seconds when I brought my face anywhere near them.
I was rotating two of them through my inner pockets and breathing downwards. :biggrin:

Then there was the extension cable problem.
It lay in a huge, rock hard, spiral "spring" across the yard for over a week.
Memory foam has nothing on PVC cable which usually lives in a coil in the shed.
We live at the bottom of a slope which causes a "thermal decline." :wink2:

Cold.JPG

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Cold, but glorious! After weeks of rain and cloud, the sky was spectacular here even with ice on everything and the ground covered in black ice. My scope thermometer said -2 C, which is not that cold compared with many evenings in previous winters. My finder scope was dewing rapidly, and several EPs as well, although I kept several in a bag in an inside pocket. The scope (180 Mak) did not dew up in the hour I was out which is mainly because of the scope insulation, although the mount slo-mo controls were fairly stiff.

Was it worth it? Definitely yes, one of the best views of M42 in many a year, with just a hint of colour beginning to show amidst the grey detail of the "batwing", and the Trapezium clear and sharp with E and F easily visible even at low magnification (using Panaview 38mm). I tried the HH as the transparency was so good, and it was just faintly visible in averted vision for part of the time. Sirius was nearly twinkle-free and the Pup was clearly visible at x190 (Vixen 15mm SLV).

Chris

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It was -6.2C when I packed up at 5:30. Well worth it as I observed several spring galaxies in Leo.😎

Edited by Les Ewan

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Last night was cold observing at our club darker site, got down to -1

My scope was iced over as was other kit and the cars, in fact the cars were iced inside too.

The sky was variable but as Chris above, had a great observation of Orion Nebula, super structure and quite outstanding, even saw the E star not sure about F though, but as soon as I stated this the seeing went to pieces.

As to what’s cold, last night was chilly, but if wrapped up well and an adequate supply of warm tea is available then quite comfortable and pleasant.

Coldest I have been in was in Leningrad as it was -45 and windy, that’s cold.

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I was out imaging as I think -2 last night.  I live near Davey T and that was his temperature, so guess it was the same.  The lock on my observatory was iced up and I could not get the key in to lock it up, even after spraying it with de-icer.  Must go out and see if I can lock it this morning as all my kit it in there!!!

Carole 

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Not saying I have imaged or done any visual in it but about 6 years ago it was minus 28 here one morning and I went outside in a T shirt and was not cold, though had the wind got up my arms would most likely have dropped off. It can be very dry here and as such the cold is not really a massive issue. I have often been outside in minus 10 with the Dob and not felt cold though well wrapped up.

My friend who is all knowing in the IT area tells me minus 10 and below is danger area for laptops and other computers as the solder can be affected with prolonged long term exposure, though mount use a different solder and are not affected but it. As he solved a problem no one else was able to do that I had, I am listening to him, he knows his stuff. I bring mine in of a night now just in case.

Alan

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Severe or prolonged cold tends to be a 'dry-cold'   as a lot of the available atmospheric moisture has precipitated or deposited out in some way already.

Astronomers in the UK can get a lot of the 'wet-cold'  over these months where air which is moist due to our maritime climate and water logged ground (!!!) suddenly gets hit by an invading polar cold front.   Lots of dew, condensation and sudden quick frosting of anything left exposed outside  (  🥶  ).

Minus 2 to 3 in 'urban' Harrogate last night.     Lovely.... bring it on.

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The padlock to my observatory shed was frozen last night too, freed it instantly by pouring a little boiling water over it.The next problem was the roof was stuck with ice and it gave gave way with a crack after pushing it up with my shoulders from the inside.

After all this and some  ungentlemanly language, a  rare benefit  of the cold weather, the ice on the wooden runners meant the roof slid back with very little effort.

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I dislike observing in low single digit celcius figures.

It's not just about the cold or about the extra weight of clothing needed or the very real expense of finding clothing which deals with colder temperatures sufficiently, but the fact that unless heading out to the mountains there just aren't that many cold days here. Today, for example, is a typical autumn day. It's a sunny blue sky 25ºc outdoors and tonight will be around 15ºc. It'll remain like that until the heart of winter kicks in when I guess everything will drop by about 10ºc for a week or two.

On the other hand, I don't mind the heat and only begin to suffer when temperatures outdoors pick up to around +50ºc.

 

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Ive been out with the scope all night at -9, with a hair dryer to keep it clear . My camera was fine at -20 photographing the Northern Lights. There are wildlife photographers who have been out in -50 to get the shot. Dont expect the batteries last long.

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