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IC4604 in LRGB


codeman
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IC4604 in LRGB Filters. Taking for Namibia during my visit in June 2019. This beautiful nebula is part of the rho Ophiuchi colorful cloud, i the center a 3 blue bright stars the reflect the blue light on the nebula.

Photo Details:
Lum - 20 x 5min = 100min
RGB - 5x5min for each channel at BIN2, 75min

Total Exposure: 175Min (~3 Hours)

Telescope: ASA 12'' F3.6
Mount: DDM 85 Unguided
Camera: FLI 16200 Mono
Filters: Astrodon

Thanks for watching,
Haim

My Flicker Page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/101543943@N04/


  

IC4604_LRGB_1.jpg

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Now that is just cheating, plain and simple.  Namibia!!!  wow.  Such small amounts of data needed.  I would give almost anything to experience conditions like that.  If you use PI invert teh image and use SCNR green, re-invert- and the red rims will vanish--No need for a mask in this case.  beautiful

Rodd

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Thank you all.

John - I don't need my laptop, briefly, the observatory has its own PC, I just plan my nights in advance and then operate the Autoslew (mount), maximDL (camrea and focuse), sequence (ASA guiding system) , The SkyX, and take subs, flats, dark, bias...at the end I download everything to my storage and than I have a full year to process after this "fishing" hunt :)

 

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Sorry Haim, for me that is just buying time on equipment and apart from the processing takes very little skill.

I note that you publish in magazines many of your images as well with no reference to that fact.

They are truly beautiful images, but without mentioning precisely how they were captured, they don't carry the same amount of weight of someone like Barry Wilson and Steve Milne who travel regular to control their own mounts with all the paraphernalia that goes with, buying your own equipment, personally setting it up, problem solving and sorting out gremlins and all from over a 1000 miles away from their homes.

No offence intended, but last time you published an image you said that you take your laptop with you and this time you are saying that you use the observatory's PC, in my opinion its not really cricket.

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Not relay understand where are you going with this :) and yes it is a bit offence, since you don't know me personalty and my skills. 

I do take my laptop to my travels to Namibia and some other stuff, I didn't say I don't bring my laptop with me, I said that I don't need laptop for operating the observatory and take the photos, just storage to download the images, I thought you are asking how it is done.

I will let you know when I will upload something from my home observatory which I fully build on my own, if you want to see my skills in light pollution.

 

 

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I think you misunderstand me. I am not disputing your skills at processing, just the merit of the capture.

What I said was that by not mentioning how you captured the images and now knowing how it was captured, doesn't carry the same merit as if it was your own equipment set up by yourself, owned by yourself.

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Brilliant image Haim.

Do professional astronomers own the telescopes they use? Very rarely, do you know how much a 10 metre telescope costs? If it's OK for them then it's OK for me.

Oh for some *truly* dark skies. I think I would be frustrated on coming home from a holiday in Namibia. My skies are fairly dark (SQI 21.66) but Namibia is in a different league, and would make me dissatisfied with where I am. It would be different perhaps if I still lived in London, at least there I *know* the sky's rubbish.

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13 minutes ago, DaveS said:

....Do professional astronomers own the telescopes they use? Very rarely, do you know how much a 10 metre telescope costs? If it's OK for them then it's OK for me.

My concern was: -

6 hours ago, Jkulin said:

What I said was that by not mentioning how you captured the images and now knowing how it was captured, doesn't carry the same merit....

Just my opinion Dave, for me unless I have set up my own equipment, captured the images my self and processed then I would never publish, intimate or omit that it was anything else.

I know this is an ongoing debate, that reflects so many peoples different opinions, that there is never going to be agreement.

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Yes, this debate can run and run, but I won't hijack Haim's thread further by continuing it here.

Just a pity that the Rho Ophiuchi star clouds are so low here and buried in clag, even from Dorset's Jurassic Coast.

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13 hours ago, Jkulin said:

I know this is an ongoing debate, that reflects so many peoples different opinions, that there is never going to be agreement.

Remote imaging is just another form of astronomy so, so long as there is no misrepresentation as to who owns the equipment, we don't see a problem. There is no need for anyone to be unpleasant. 

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A wonderful image.  I love to see what can be achieved from truly dark sites using high quality equipment.  Am I jealous, oh yes!  Am I resentful, not in the least!  I would be mortified if people who go on astro holidays or have remote observatories felt it in appropriate to post here in just the same way as I would be if people worried about posting a moon image taken through a Tasco scope using a mobile phone.  Kudos to you Codeman, and what Rodd said about the stars!!

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