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alanjgreen

Saw the Mercury black dot !!

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Just bagged 10 minutes between the clouds and got to see the Mercury shadow transit!

Its so long since I used the Lunt that I took a few seconds to get back into the groove of tuning the double stack and letting some air into the tuner as it was flat.

Not much else on the disc - 3 x sets of proms, 3 tiny filaments, saw one small bright flux patch briefly.

But the Mercury shadow was nice and clear and a decent sized patch too.

Just got back inside before it started spotting with rain! Fingers crossed for another clear patch later ...

Alan

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Well done, you got to see it, many people will not be so lucky today sadly.

I watched the first 50 mins or so before the sun set, nice sunny day here though.

Managed some images with my modest equipment.

530181986_MercuryTransitwhite1.jpg.4552a77ff2e7fa7c3c7858df696bdc66.jpg1546788609_MercuryTransitHA3.jpg.13f7028d0c6641f46b7e9fbfb375fbd8.jpg

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A likely challange to anything Hubble could muster, via the seldom mastered technique of shaky hold of phone about 50mm over the eyepiece afforded me this. 
Also my first viewing of solar via a solar film filter I never realised I had on an Equinox 80 and Morpheus 12.5mm, So quite special in its laughably amateurish way.IMG_1768.thumb.JPG.e67983724e0d33af7f4caf53afbd971b.JPG

Edited by steveex2003
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Whoo! I saw it too. I am in North London and used my Coronado PST to dodge the clouds and see 10 minutes at the start and another 10 at midpoint of the transit.

Great images  by MoonNut and Steveex2003.

Mercury may appear as just a dot in front of the sun but I was very pleased to have seen it. Commiserations to people who didn't get a break in the clouds, the same thing happened to me for the Venus transit years ago.

My attempts at imaging through solarfoil produced a white disc with absolutely no dot on it. Back to the drawing board on that one.

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I got a brief window between rain showers and saw it ;) Was hoping to observe through 1st and 2nd contact, but no joy - rain.  Just glad to catch it at all in my LS50DS  - missed Venus a couple of yrs ago due to the weather...

Edited by niallk
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On 11/11/2019 at 14:54, MoonNut said:

Well done, you got to see it, many people will not be so lucky today sadly.

I watched the first 50 mins or so before the sun set, nice sunny day here though.

Managed some images with my modest equipment.

 

Nice pics! You've captured the exact same prominence I saw through my H-alpha scope :)

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Some sense of scale isn't it - seeing the dot of Mercury vs the size of the prominence & the Sun!

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Agreed. As with a lot of visual Astro. Not spectacular to look at, but once you stop and think about what you are seeing....

I was thrilled to get a few mins with that little black disc on the face of the sun.


Paul

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