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At our observatory we too have a C14 (non-edge) and it is an incredible piece of equipment, however I feel like I'm getting some underwhelming pictures of the moon in comparison to others I've looked at.

I was wondering if anyone could give me some tips on how to improve with the C14?

I have an ASI120MC that goes on a visual back. I also have a 2x barlow but seeing conditions are terrible to even attempt to use it

I've attached my most recent attempts, I feel as if the focus may be slightly off as I find the focuser to be terrible especially with the shift. Surely they would've come up with something better for a scope so expensive?

I used AS!3 for stacking and deconvolution on Pixinsight with unsharp mask and MLT

The sampling would also be okay with the barlow, but it's impossible to use with the seeing conditions again.

Thanks,

Matt

22_01_04_lapl4_ap1749.jpg

21_50_11_lapl4_ap2568.jpg

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+1

Wondering this myself too.

EDIT:  Seeing was dreadful last night so don't beat yourself up if your concerns are on the basis of last night's efforts.

Edited by kirkster501

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Where is the C14 kept?

I have tried with a Meade 16" SCT housed in a dome and at the dome opening there was a "howling gale" (slight exaggeration)which I think was due to the heat from bodies computer etc escaping to the night air.
 

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2 minutes ago, Ibbo! said:

Where is the C14 kept?

I have tried with a Meade 16" SCT housed in a dome and at the dome opening there was a "howling gale" (slight exaggeration)which I think was due to the heat from bodies computer etc escaping to the night air.
 

It's housed in a dome. Would there be a way around this?

Edited by matt_baker

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From home with my C11 I do not planetary image from the obshed but set up out side and sit away from the scope.

At a guess seperate warm room would be best.

Random thought block round the dome skirt and fully open the slit so heat goes out of the top.

Cut the number of bodies in the dome, when we did outreach it was oddly funny looking through the scope when somebody was stood in front of the scope and the dme opening esp at moderate power.

 

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The only people who are actually in the observatory at any one time are my dad and myself, surely that can't be messing it up?

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I would say it is probably down to bad seeing...and the bigger the scope the worse it will be.

 

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What's the visual image like by comparison at the time of imaging?   🙂

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Dome seeing! I'm a martyr to dome seeing. Except when I'm not. :icon_scratch:
My two story, entirely wooden, observatory building is open all around just below observatory floor level.
That's a 20cm or 8" wide open slot all the way around. The floor boards are deliberately gapped to provide air circulation.
An open, double door, down on the ground floor provides a chimney effect. Heat rises!

The dome skirt is deliberately leaky. A rubber skirt hangs down by its own weight and flaps in any breeze.
I have a large door to the west which can push the prevailing wind out through the observing slit if need be.

The dome and building are plywood covered to be thermally neutral. Low thermal mass and poor thermal absorption.
Badly spoilt by green [camouflage] paint! It ought to be highly reflective white! :blush:

I sit to the north of the pier at my imaging monitor. I wear highly insulating down clothing to slow body heat loss.
The open observing slit [beyond the zenith] should carry my body heat straight upwards and away.
Hopefully before it reaches the light path of the telescopes usually facing somewhere to the south.

Most observatories are built of thermally absorbent materials baking in the sunshine all day long.
Patios and buildings are even worse! They absorb the sun's heat and let it go again all night long.

So the dome, building, surroundings, mounting and instruments are very likely to be much warmer than [usually falling] ambient.
Excess warmth means a bonfire of the vanities of actually daring to own an observatory.
Now add extra human bods inside your "toasty warm" observatory. It can only end in tears. 🤣

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It may take 2 or more hours for the thermals within the tube to equalise  if you kept it inside the house it may never equalise throughout the night..

Good seeing conditions are really rare, the jetstream needs to be well out of the way to have really good seeing conditions, just to have a clear night lately is a big enough ask!!

Just need to make sure that you're ready for those rare nights... collimation checked..get your focus spot on but don't chase the seeing.. I'm sure it will all come together it's just climate conditions ..

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