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Nigella Bryant

Heated body warmers

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Hi all, with the winter near, does anyone use the USB rechargeable body warmers? Supposed to keep you warm for up to 6 to 8hrs. 

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I've used a Blazewear gilet (the old style they did with heavier padding/fleece rather than the new lightweight ones) - really effective 🙂 

Helen

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2 hours ago, skybadger said:

 Amazon do heated gilets for £80

I'd seen them for £20 on amazon, wondered if anyone had used them. At 61 I feel the cold so thought it might help during the winter months. 

Edited by Nigella Bryant

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Base layers and ski clothing ...worked for me when it was -35...

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Given the statistics show that women need a higher body temperature to function effectively I think for £20 might well be worth a go!  You can do layers too 😉  and turn off if you get overheated!

Helen

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1 hour ago, Helen said:

Given the statistics show that women need a higher body temperature to function effectively I think for £20 might well be worth a go!  You can do layers too 😉  and turn off if you get overheated!

Helen

Thanks Helen, yeah for £20 it's worth a go and as you say, I can turn it off or even down. Toasty observing here I go, lol. 

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A word of caution if I may. See where the kit was made, and if it has safety approvals. A bit like you do for electric blankets.
Also look at the provenance of the retailer.
Is it an online only never heard of? Or a known high street name?

Get the kit checked over by someone who understands this elastictrickery stuff if it does not have easily traceable approvals.

Last winter my wife bought some heated gloves from a seller at that well known South American river company.

The lithium cells were a type that did not include short circuit or overload protection.
There was no fuse or other protection in the wiring from the power cells to the glove heating elements.
The gloves were made from a flammable material.

It doesn't take big leap of imagination to see a wiring short in a glove causing excessive heating in the glove and hot dripping or burning fabric stuck to skin.
An unprotected lithium cell can involuntarily dissassemble (tech speak for explode) if short circuited.

I have seen mains powered products (though not clothing) from China that contains fake fuses, fake approvals labels and incorrect unsafe fuse/mains cable combinations.

If a dubious charger, or music player, or computer goes 'pop' and you are around to turn off the power before the house burns down, fine.
Disrobing when layered is something different. Anyone who has ever had a wasp sneak into clothing will understand the urgency and problems.

Caveat emptor!

David.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Carbon Brush said:

A word of caution if I may. See where the kit was made, and if it has safety approvals. A bit like you do for electric blankets.
Also look at the provenance of the retailer.
Is it an online only never heard of? Or a known high street name?

Get the kit checked over by someone who understands this elastictrickery stuff if it does not have easily traceable approvals.

Last winter my wife bought some heated gloves from a seller at that well known South American river company.

The lithium cells were a type that did not include short circuit or overload protection.
There was no fuse or other protection in the wiring from the power cells to the glove heating elements.
The gloves were made from a flammable material.

It doesn't take big leap of imagination to see a wiring short in a glove causing excessive heating in the glove and hot dripping or burning fabric stuck to skin.
An unprotected lithium cell can involuntarily dissassemble (tech speak for explode) if short circuited.

I have seen mains powered products (though not clothing) from China that contains fake fuses, fake approvals labels and incorrect unsafe fuse/mains cable combinations.

If a dubious charger, or music player, or computer goes 'pop' and you are around to turn off the power before the house burns down, fine.
Disrobing when layered is something different. Anyone who has ever had a wasp sneak into clothing will understand the urgency and problems.

Caveat emptor!

David.

 

 

Thanks David, wise words. Note taken. 

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Although they are expensive, genuine down duvet jackets are incredibly warm and very light.

Also remember that vast amounts of body heat are lost through the head and that the only part of a warm boot which really matters is the sole. Taking a piece of camping mat outside to stand on is a good trick.

Olly

Edited by ollypenrice
Typo
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14 hours ago, Carbon Brush said:

A word of caution if I may. See where the kit was made, and if it has safety approvals. A bit like you do for electric blankets.
Also look at the provenance of the retailer.
Is it an online only never heard of? Or a known high street name?

Get the kit checked over by someone who understands this elastictrickery stuff if it does not have easily traceable approvals.

Last winter my wife bought some heated gloves from a seller at that well known South American river company.

The lithium cells were a type that did not include short circuit or overload protection.
There was no fuse or other protection in the wiring from the power cells to the glove heating elements.
The gloves were made from a flammable material.

It doesn't take big leap of imagination to see a wiring short in a glove causing excessive heating in the glove and hot dripping or burning fabric stuck to skin.
An unprotected lithium cell can involuntarily dissassemble (tech speak for explode) if short circuited.

I have seen mains powered products (though not clothing) from China that contains fake fuses, fake approvals labels and incorrect unsafe fuse/mains cable combinations.

If a dubious charger, or music player, or computer goes 'pop' and you are around to turn off the power before the house burns down, fine.
Disrobing when layered is something different. Anyone who has ever had a wasp sneak into clothing will understand the urgency and problems.

Caveat emptor!

David.

 

 

Just had the mandatory fire training at work and it's shocking how fast a charged, dubious lithium cell can 'disassemble' and burn a house down!

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Muck Arctic sport boots... tried insoles of varying uselessness, the pain of cold feet really kills observing sessions.

Never has cold feet with the Mucks, sometimes feet end up too hot... 🙂 

Still not found good gloves though.

Peter

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2 hours ago, PeterW said:

Muck Arctic sport boots... tried insoles of varying uselessness, the pain of cold feet really kills observing sessions.

Never has cold feet with the Mucks, sometimes feet end up too hot... 🙂 

Still not found good gloves though.

Peter

Hi Peter,

I have been searching for heated gloves for years without success as my hands go white and loose circulation in the cold weather. About a year ago a friend recommended USB rechargeable hand heaters which have 3 heat settings and my cold hand days are (thankfully) now over. There are many different makes and types on the market which I assume I can't mention on here but if you PM me I can give you the details. BTW I don't use ordinary gloves but mitts as you can keep the hand warmers in the palm your closed hand. They are so good I have 2 pair so I am never without.

Maurice.

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We've all got different metabolisms and not withstanding how good a Blazewear or equivalent can work (says me with one) I tend to prefer warmer clothing like down jackets as per Olly's post above. Modern cold weather gear seems to be set up for the athletes amongst us with the assumption we're running around and doing stuff rather than sitting still whilst imaging or moving minimally whilst observing and therefore, for me at least, doesn't quite do the job.

I spent a fair chunk on some decent boots that are rated down to -60c (although I think that just means the rubber will cope at that temp) and that have pretty thick soles and a decent coat with umpteen layers underneath. I actually avoid actively heating my hands or feet as I suspect doing so fools the body into thinking you're warmer than you are and therefore not giving you a sufficient warning that you're getting too cold (having had hypothermia once I don't want a repeat!).

The one thing that makes a big big difference for me is food. When I'm out at night and it's genuinely cold, apart from lots of clothes I eat, lots. A lot of the food I'll have is fatty stuff too like cheese. (OK, I'll usually squeeze in biscuits and/or a pot noodle too). On nights that I don't eat lots I feel the cold even when comparatively warm, when I do eat lots I don't feel the cold. Just don't leave the food out in the cold. Chewing frozen food really isn't helpful!

To each their own of course - if your hands suffer/are painful from the cold then definitely go for hand warmers :)  I'm lucky, cold hands don't bother me (hmmm.. maybe thats a problem!).

James

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The one thing that makes a big big difference for me is food. When I'm out at night and it's genuinely cold, apart from lots of clothes I eat, lots. A lot of the food I'll have is fatty stuff too like cheese. (OK, I'll usually squeeze in biscuits and/or a pot noodle too). On nights that I don't eat lots I feel the cold even when comparatively warm, when I do eat lots I don't feel the cold. Just don't leave the food out in the cold. Chewing frozen food really isn’t helpful!

Great tip for anyone who is not already overweight 😀

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1 hour ago, banjaxed said:

Great tip for anyone who is not already overweight 😀

There aren’t enough clear nights to make a difference. Says the definitely not waif-like James..

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